Hypopituitarism stabilizes the renal and retinal complications of diabetes mellitus

M. Plumb, Karl A Nath, E. R. Seaquist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1953, Poulsen described the remarkable case of a woman with type I diabetes mellitus who experienced resolution of her retinopathy following postpartum pituitary necrosis. Since that time, many investigators have pursued the hypothesis that anterior pituitary hormones, particularly growth hormone, play a role in the pathogenesis of the microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus. While most observers have demonstrated the importance of growth hormone in the initiation and progression of diabetic retinopathy, the role of growth hormone in the development of diabetic nephropathy has been more difficult to document. In this case report, we describe a woman with long-standing type I diabetes mellitus complicated by retinopathy and nephropathy whose complications stabilized as she developed growth hormone deficiency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-267
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Nephrology
Volume12
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Hypopituitarism
Diabetes Complications
Growth Hormone
Kidney
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Anterior Pituitary Hormones
Diabetic Nephropathies
Diabetic Retinopathy
Postpartum Period
Necrosis
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Hypopituitarism stabilizes the renal and retinal complications of diabetes mellitus. / Plumb, M.; Nath, Karl A; Seaquist, E. R.

In: American Journal of Nephrology, Vol. 12, No. 4, 1992, p. 265-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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