Hypercalcemia

G. G. Klee, P. C. Kao, H. Heath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypercalcemia is a relatively common clinical finding; prevalence rates are 1.4 to 3.0 per cent in hospitalized and general clinical populations. Malignancy is the major cause of hypercalcemia in hospital patients, whereas primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is the major cause in ambulatory patients. In both hospitalized and ambulatory patients, however, there are many other causes of hypercalcemia, and numerous procedures have been proposed to aid in the differential diagnosis. Unfortunately, no single test is truly diagnostic. The work-up for hypercalcemia requires an integrated knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the various procedures as well as an understanding of the various clinical presentations associated with hypercalcemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)573-600
Number of pages28
JournalEndocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America
Volume17
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1988

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Hypercalcemia
Primary Hyperparathyroidism
Differential Diagnosis
Population
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Klee, G. G., Kao, P. C., & Heath, H. (1988). Hypercalcemia. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America, 17(3), 573-600.

Hypercalcemia. / Klee, G. G.; Kao, P. C.; Heath, H.

In: Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America, Vol. 17, No. 3, 1988, p. 573-600.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klee, GG, Kao, PC & Heath, H 1988, 'Hypercalcemia', Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 573-600.
Klee GG, Kao PC, Heath H. Hypercalcemia. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America. 1988;17(3):573-600.
Klee, G. G. ; Kao, P. C. ; Heath, H. / Hypercalcemia. In: Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America. 1988 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 573-600.
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