How effective is effective dose as a predictor of radiation risk?

Cynthia H McCollough, Jodie A. Christner, James M. Kofler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This article discusses the relatively recent adoption of effective dose in medicine that allows comparison between different imaging techniques, and describes the principles, pitfalls, and potential value of effective dose. The medical community must use this information wisely, realizing that effective dose represents a generic estimate of risk from a given procedure for a generic model of the human body. CONCLUSION. Effective dose is not the risk for any one individual. Due to the inherent uncertainties and oversimplifications involved, effective dose should not be used for epidemiologic studies or for estimating population risks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)890-896
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume194
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

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Radiation
Human Body
Uncertainty
Epidemiologic Studies
Medicine
Population

Keywords

  • Dose-length product
  • Effective dose
  • ICRP
  • Radiation risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

How effective is effective dose as a predictor of radiation risk? / McCollough, Cynthia H; Christner, Jodie A.; Kofler, James M.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 194, No. 4, 04.2010, p. 890-896.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCollough, Cynthia H ; Christner, Jodie A. ; Kofler, James M. / How effective is effective dose as a predictor of radiation risk?. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 2010 ; Vol. 194, No. 4. pp. 890-896.
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