Hospital Performance and Differences by Kidney Function in the Use of Recommended Therapies After Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes

Uptal D. Patel, Fang-Shu Ou, E. Magnus Ohman, W. Brian Gibler, Charles V. Pollack, Eric D. Peterson, Matthew T. Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiac events and death; however, underuse of guideline-recommended therapies is widespread. The extent to which hospital performance affects the care of patients with CKD and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACSs) is unknown. Study Design: Observational cohort. Setting & Participants: 81,374 patients with NSTE ACSs treated at 327 US hospitals. Predictor: Hospital performance, measured by quartiles of composite adherence to American Heart Association class I guidelines for therapy acutely (aspirin, β-blockers, clopidogrel, heparin, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors) and at discharge (aspirin, clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and lipid-lowering agents) in eligible patients. Outcomes & Measurements: Use of each American Heart Association class I acute and discharge therapy stratified by continuous estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Multivariable models were adjusted for demographics, clinical factors, and hospital features. Results: Better-performing hospitals had lower prescribing rates for most therapies (5 of 9) with lower levels of kidney function, whereas lower-performing hospitals were more likely to have similar prescribing rates across the eGFR spectrum, suggesting that prescribing patterns at these hospitals were insensitive to differences in eGFR. Limitations: Observational design, selection bias of study cohort. Conclusion: Patients with lower levels of kidney function admitted with NSTE ACSs are less likely to receive evidence-based therapies. Treatment disparities related to CKD are most evident at top-performing hospitals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-437
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Acute Coronary Syndrome
Kidney
clopidogrel
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Therapeutics
Aspirin
Guidelines
Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex
Selection Bias
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Observational Studies
Heparin
Patient Care
Cohort Studies
Demography
Lipids

Keywords

  • acute coronary syndrome
  • cardiovascular medications
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • practice guidelines
  • quality of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Hospital Performance and Differences by Kidney Function in the Use of Recommended Therapies After Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes. / Patel, Uptal D.; Ou, Fang-Shu; Ohman, E. Magnus; Gibler, W. Brian; Pollack, Charles V.; Peterson, Eric D.; Roe, Matthew T.

In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol. 53, No. 3, 01.03.2009, p. 426-437.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patel, Uptal D. ; Ou, Fang-Shu ; Ohman, E. Magnus ; Gibler, W. Brian ; Pollack, Charles V. ; Peterson, Eric D. ; Roe, Matthew T. / Hospital Performance and Differences by Kidney Function in the Use of Recommended Therapies After Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes. In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 2009 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 426-437.
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