Hospice in End-of-Life Patients With Cancer: Does It Lead to Changes in Nonhospice Health Care Utilization After Stopping Cancer Treatment?

Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Elisabeth K. Stephens, Aminah Jatoi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study assessed the patterns of nonhospice health care utilization among 207 deceased cancer patients and focused on outcomes after cancer treatment was stopped. A total of 117 (57%) were enrolled in hospice. The mean cumulative number of emergency department visits, hospitalizations, or other noncancer clinic visits (standard deviation) among those enrolled and not enrolled in hospice was 1.8 (± 1.8) and 3.11 (± 3.0), respectively (P < .0001). Among hospice enrollees, the mean cumulative visits (standard deviation) was 1.29 (± 1.7) and 0.5 (± 1.0) before and after enrollment, respectively (P < .0001). For patients who eventually enrolled, the rates of nonhospice health care visits (visits per week) yielded a trend to suggest a decline (P = .054). Hospice was associated with a drop in nonhospice-related health care utilization, thus suggesting it provides timely medical interventions and favorable continuity of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)392-395
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • cancer
  • end of life
  • health care utilization
  • hospice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Hospice in End-of-Life Patients With Cancer: Does It Lead to Changes in Nonhospice Health Care Utilization After Stopping Cancer Treatment?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this