Hormone receptor immunohistochemistry and human papillomavirus in situ hybridization are useful for distinguishing endocervical and endometrial adenocarcinomas

Annette Staebler, Mark E. Sherman, Richard J. Zaino, Brigitte M. Ronnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Determining the origin of uterine adenocarcinomas can be difficult in biopsy and curettage specimens because the morphologic spectrum of endocervical and endometrial adenocarcinomas overlaps. In addition, in hysterectomy specimens the primary site is often equivocal for tumors that involve predominantly the lower uterine segment and endocervix and lack identifiable precursor lesions. We assessed the value of immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptors and in situ hybridization for human papillomavirus DNA detection in making this clinically relevant distinction. We evaluated a set of 48 adenocarcinomas of unequivocal origin (24 endocervical carcinomas and 24 endometrial endometrioid carcinomas without cervical extension) and then tested seven lower uterine segment/endocervical carcinomas of equivocal origin to determine whether patterns established in the initial set would permit definitive assignment of primary site for the equivocal set. Only one (4.2%) of 24 endocervical carcinomas was positive for both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, whereas 18 (75%) of 24 endometrial carcinomas were positive for estrogen receptor and 23 (95.8%) of 24 endometrial carcinomas were positive for progesterone receptor (p <0.001, X2 test). Human papillomavirus DNA was detected in 16 (66.7%) of 24 endocervical carcinomas and in none of 24 endometrial carcinomas (p <0.001, X2 test). Of the seven tumors of equivocal origin, five could be definitively classified as either endocervical or endometrial in origin based on their demonstration of a characteristic profile with these assays (either estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor-negative/human papillomavirus-positive, consistent with endocervical origin or estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor-positive/human papillomavirus-negative, consistent with endometrial origin). We conclude that hormone receptor immunohistochemistry and human papillomavirus in situ hybridization are useful for distinguishing endocervical and endometrial adenocarcinomas. The clinical utility of these techniques should be evaluated in studies that include curettage and biopsy specimens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)998-1006
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgical Pathology
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Progesterone Receptors
Estrogen Receptors
In Situ Hybridization
Endometrial Neoplasms
Adenocarcinoma
Immunohistochemistry
Hormones
Carcinoma
Curettage
Endometrioid Carcinoma
Biopsy
DNA
Hysterectomy
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Endocervical adenocarcinoma
  • Endometrial adenocarcinoma
  • Hormone receptors
  • Human papillomavirus
  • In situ hybridization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Hormone receptor immunohistochemistry and human papillomavirus in situ hybridization are useful for distinguishing endocervical and endometrial adenocarcinomas. / Staebler, Annette; Sherman, Mark E.; Zaino, Richard J.; Ronnett, Brigitte M.

In: American Journal of Surgical Pathology, Vol. 26, No. 8, 2002, p. 998-1006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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