HIV infection and lymphoma

K. L. Grogg, R. F. Miller, Ahmet Dogan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

150 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence of lymphoma in patients with HIV infection greatly exceeds that of the general population. The increased risk for lymphoma appears related to multiple factors, including the transforming properties of the retrovirus itself, the immunosuppression and cytokine dysregulation that results from the disease, and, most importantly, opportunistic infections with other lymphotrophic herpes viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus 8. Histologically lymphomas fall into three groups: (1) those also occurring in immunocompetent patients; (2) those occurring more specifically in HIV-positive patients; and (3) those also occurring in patients with other forms of immunosuppression. Aggressive lymphomas account for the vast majority cases. They frequently present with advanced stage, bulky disease with high tumour burden and, typically, involve extranodal sites. Clinical outcome appears to be worse than in similar aggressive lymphomas in the general population. However, following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the risk for developing lymphoma in the context of HIV infection has decreased and the clinical outcome has improved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1365-1372
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Pathology
Volume60
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

Fingerprint

HIV Infections
Lymphoma
Immunosuppression
Human Herpesvirus 8
Opportunistic Infections
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Retroviridae
Tumor Burden
Human Herpesvirus 4
Population
HIV
Cytokines
Viruses
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Grogg, K. L., Miller, R. F., & Dogan, A. (2007). HIV infection and lymphoma. Journal of Clinical Pathology, 60(12), 1365-1372. https://doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2007.051953

HIV infection and lymphoma. / Grogg, K. L.; Miller, R. F.; Dogan, Ahmet.

In: Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 60, No. 12, 12.2007, p. 1365-1372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grogg, KL, Miller, RF & Dogan, A 2007, 'HIV infection and lymphoma', Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 60, no. 12, pp. 1365-1372. https://doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2007.051953
Grogg, K. L. ; Miller, R. F. ; Dogan, Ahmet. / HIV infection and lymphoma. In: Journal of Clinical Pathology. 2007 ; Vol. 60, No. 12. pp. 1365-1372.
@article{065520ac18e34c409b2156b91a34e155,
title = "HIV infection and lymphoma",
abstract = "The incidence of lymphoma in patients with HIV infection greatly exceeds that of the general population. The increased risk for lymphoma appears related to multiple factors, including the transforming properties of the retrovirus itself, the immunosuppression and cytokine dysregulation that results from the disease, and, most importantly, opportunistic infections with other lymphotrophic herpes viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus 8. Histologically lymphomas fall into three groups: (1) those also occurring in immunocompetent patients; (2) those occurring more specifically in HIV-positive patients; and (3) those also occurring in patients with other forms of immunosuppression. Aggressive lymphomas account for the vast majority cases. They frequently present with advanced stage, bulky disease with high tumour burden and, typically, involve extranodal sites. Clinical outcome appears to be worse than in similar aggressive lymphomas in the general population. However, following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the risk for developing lymphoma in the context of HIV infection has decreased and the clinical outcome has improved.",
author = "Grogg, {K. L.} and Miller, {R. F.} and Ahmet Dogan",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1136/jcp.2007.051953",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "1365--1372",
journal = "Molecular pathology : MP",
issn = "0021-9746",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - HIV infection and lymphoma

AU - Grogg, K. L.

AU - Miller, R. F.

AU - Dogan, Ahmet

PY - 2007/12

Y1 - 2007/12

N2 - The incidence of lymphoma in patients with HIV infection greatly exceeds that of the general population. The increased risk for lymphoma appears related to multiple factors, including the transforming properties of the retrovirus itself, the immunosuppression and cytokine dysregulation that results from the disease, and, most importantly, opportunistic infections with other lymphotrophic herpes viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus 8. Histologically lymphomas fall into three groups: (1) those also occurring in immunocompetent patients; (2) those occurring more specifically in HIV-positive patients; and (3) those also occurring in patients with other forms of immunosuppression. Aggressive lymphomas account for the vast majority cases. They frequently present with advanced stage, bulky disease with high tumour burden and, typically, involve extranodal sites. Clinical outcome appears to be worse than in similar aggressive lymphomas in the general population. However, following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the risk for developing lymphoma in the context of HIV infection has decreased and the clinical outcome has improved.

AB - The incidence of lymphoma in patients with HIV infection greatly exceeds that of the general population. The increased risk for lymphoma appears related to multiple factors, including the transforming properties of the retrovirus itself, the immunosuppression and cytokine dysregulation that results from the disease, and, most importantly, opportunistic infections with other lymphotrophic herpes viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus 8. Histologically lymphomas fall into three groups: (1) those also occurring in immunocompetent patients; (2) those occurring more specifically in HIV-positive patients; and (3) those also occurring in patients with other forms of immunosuppression. Aggressive lymphomas account for the vast majority cases. They frequently present with advanced stage, bulky disease with high tumour burden and, typically, involve extranodal sites. Clinical outcome appears to be worse than in similar aggressive lymphomas in the general population. However, following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the risk for developing lymphoma in the context of HIV infection has decreased and the clinical outcome has improved.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=37048999551&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=37048999551&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/jcp.2007.051953

DO - 10.1136/jcp.2007.051953

M3 - Article

C2 - 18042692

AN - SCOPUS:37048999551

VL - 60

SP - 1365

EP - 1372

JO - Molecular pathology : MP

JF - Molecular pathology : MP

SN - 0021-9746

IS - 12

ER -