History of sexual abuse and obesity treatment outcome

Teresa K. King, Matthew M Clark, Vincent Pera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, clinical data from 22 obese women who reported a history of sexual abuse were compared to clinical data from 22 obese women who denied a history of sexual abuse. Subjects were matched for body mass index (BMI), sex, and age. All subjects were enrolled in a multidisciplinary outpatient hospital-based very-low-calorie diet (VLCD) weight-management program. Subjects completed a structured clinical interview, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Weight Efficacy Life-Style Questionnaire (WEL). Subjects with a history of sexual abuse lost significantly less weight and reported more episodes of nonadherence. Possible explanations for these findings include both psychiatric distress and low weight self-efficacy. The difference between the groups in self-efficacy was greatest in situations involving negative affect or physical discomfort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-290
Number of pages8
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sex Offenses
Obesity
Weights and Measures
Self Efficacy
Caloric Restriction
Psychiatry
Life Style
Body Mass Index
Outpatients
Interviews
Depression
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

History of sexual abuse and obesity treatment outcome. / King, Teresa K.; Clark, Matthew M; Pera, Vincent.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 21, No. 3, 05.1996, p. 283-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

King, Teresa K. ; Clark, Matthew M ; Pera, Vincent. / History of sexual abuse and obesity treatment outcome. In: Addictive Behaviors. 1996 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 283-290.
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