Highlights of latest American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association Guidelines for Management of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

Thomas J. Ryan, Rowlens Melduni

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recently published American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction stress 3 major points: (1) the prehospital phase from the onset of symptoms to definitive therapy in the emergency department must be shortened by 50% in order to reduce further the estimated 30% mortality rate for all patients in the community who suffer an acute myocardial infarction; (2) a more widespread use of thrombolytic agents is warranted because of the demonstrated, extremely time-dependent benefit to survivorship: the sooner it is given, the better the outcome; and (3) the administration of aspirin (160-325 mg) daily for an indefinite period is perhaps the most important therapy for a patient with acute myocardial infarction. Long-term therapy with lipid-lowering Statin drugs and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor agents are gaining increasing evidence-based data to support their perpetual use as well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-43
Number of pages9
JournalCardiology in Review
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Myocardial Infarction
Guidelines
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Fibrinolytic Agents
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Aspirin
Hospital Emergency Service
Therapeutics
Survival Rate
Lipids
Mortality
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Acute myocardial infarction guidelines
  • Myocardial infarction treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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N2 - The recently published American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction stress 3 major points: (1) the prehospital phase from the onset of symptoms to definitive therapy in the emergency department must be shortened by 50% in order to reduce further the estimated 30% mortality rate for all patients in the community who suffer an acute myocardial infarction; (2) a more widespread use of thrombolytic agents is warranted because of the demonstrated, extremely time-dependent benefit to survivorship: the sooner it is given, the better the outcome; and (3) the administration of aspirin (160-325 mg) daily for an indefinite period is perhaps the most important therapy for a patient with acute myocardial infarction. Long-term therapy with lipid-lowering Statin drugs and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor agents are gaining increasing evidence-based data to support their perpetual use as well.

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