High resolution X-ray imaging of dynamic solute transport in cyclically deformed porous tissue scaffolds

Jorn O. Den Buijs, Kee W. Lee, Steven M. Jorgensen, Shanfeng Wang, Michael J Yaszemski, Erik L. Ritman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective was to develop a method for high-resolution imaging of dynamic solute transport in cyclically deforming porous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. A flexible cubic scaffold with single cylindrical channel was fabricated from a biodegradable polymer blend using a combined 3D printing and injection molding technique. The scaffold was attached to the bottom of a fluid reservoir mounted underneath a compression apparatus placed inside the X-ray scanner. The scaffold was positioned with the channel axis perpendicular to the X-ray beam. The container was filled with glycerin, and a solution of the contrast agent sodium iodide (Nal) in glycerin was injected into the scaffold channel. Intervals of compression cycles (14.5 ± 2.1 % compression at 1.0 Hz) were applied to the top face of the scaffold. After each interval the compression was temporarily paused to obtain a two-dimensional image at 20 μm pixel resolution. A series of images was also obtained without application of the compression cycles to quantify the effect of passive diffusional removal of Nal from the channel. The average Nal concentration in the channel decreased by 82% after 300 cycles (5 min.) of compression, by 40% after 60 min. of passive removal. Spatial profiles of the Nal concentration along the channel axis indicated that compression-induced transport preferentially removed the contrast agent at the pore openings. We conclude that convective transport induced by cyclic mechanical deformation of artificial tissue scaffolds could significantly contribute to the rate and depth of nutrient transport inside the scaffold, as compared to slow diffusive transport alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume6916
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
EventMedical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 17 2008Feb 19 2008

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period2/17/082/19/08

Fingerprint

Solute transport
Scaffolds
Scaffolds (biology)
Imaging techniques
X rays
Glycerol
Compaction
Biodegradable polymers
Polymer blends
Tissue engineering
Injection molding
Nutrients
Containers
Printing
Pixels
Sodium
Fluids
Tissue Scaffolds

Keywords

  • Dynamic compression
  • Projection x-ray
  • Scaffold
  • Solute transport
  • Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Den Buijs, J. O., Lee, K. W., Jorgensen, S. M., Wang, S., Yaszemski, M. J., & Ritman, E. L. (2008). High resolution X-ray imaging of dynamic solute transport in cyclically deformed porous tissue scaffolds. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 6916). [69161A] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.772057

High resolution X-ray imaging of dynamic solute transport in cyclically deformed porous tissue scaffolds. / Den Buijs, Jorn O.; Lee, Kee W.; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Wang, Shanfeng; Yaszemski, Michael J; Ritman, Erik L.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6916 2008. 69161A.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Den Buijs, JO, Lee, KW, Jorgensen, SM, Wang, S, Yaszemski, MJ & Ritman, EL 2008, High resolution X-ray imaging of dynamic solute transport in cyclically deformed porous tissue scaffolds. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 6916, 69161A, Medical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images, San Diego, CA, United States, 2/17/08. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.772057
Den Buijs JO, Lee KW, Jorgensen SM, Wang S, Yaszemski MJ, Ritman EL. High resolution X-ray imaging of dynamic solute transport in cyclically deformed porous tissue scaffolds. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6916. 2008. 69161A https://doi.org/10.1117/12.772057
Den Buijs, Jorn O. ; Lee, Kee W. ; Jorgensen, Steven M. ; Wang, Shanfeng ; Yaszemski, Michael J ; Ritman, Erik L. / High resolution X-ray imaging of dynamic solute transport in cyclically deformed porous tissue scaffolds. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6916 2008.
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