High-resolution genomic analysis in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia identifies disease-specific and common abnormalities with marginal zone lymphomas

Esteban Braggio, Jonathan Keats, Xavier Leleu, Scott Van Wier, Victor Hugo Jimenez-Zepeda, Roelandt Schop, Marta Chesi, Michael Barrett, Alexander Keith Stewart, Ahmet Dogan, Peter Leif Bergsagel, Irene Ghobrial, Rafael Fonseca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cytogenetic analyses have been historically limited in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) by the difficulty to obtain tumor metaphases. Thus, few recurrent karyotypic abnormalities have been reported and the molecular consequences of these imbalances are largely unknown. We used an array-based comparative genomic hybridization approach to better characterize the recurrent chromosome abnormalities associated with WM pathogenesis and to compare them with the publicly available findings in other B-cell neoplasias. The majority of the recurrent chromosome abnormalities identified in WM were shared with marginal zone lymphomas (MZL), as deletions of 6q23 and 13q14 and gains of 3q13-q28, 6p and 18q. On the other hand, gains of 4q and 8q were recurrently identified in WM but have not been described as being common abnormalities in MZL. The genetic consequences of these specific abnormalities remain elusive and further studies are critical to refine the search and to precise the molecular pathways affected by these abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-42
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Lymphoma and Myeloma
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Keywords

  • ACGH
  • Comparative genomic analysis
  • Waldenström

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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