HIC1 hypermethylation is a late event in hematopoietic neoplasms

Jean Pierre J Issa, Barbara A. Zehnbauer, Scott H Kaufmann, Maggie A. Biel, Stephen B. Baylin

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Abstract

HIC1, a candidate tumor suppressor gene on 17p13.3, is hypermethylated and silenced in a large number of solid tumors. To determine its potential role in leukemias, we studied its methylation status in normal and neoplastic hematopoietic cells. We found HIC1 to be unmethylated in peripheral blood cells, bone marrow cells, and CD34+ cells. HIC1 was rarely methylated in newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemias (10%) but was relatively frequently methylated in newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (25%), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL; 53%), and chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (50%). By contrast, HIC1 was hypermethylated in 100% of recurrent ALL and 100% of blast crisis chronic myelogenous leukemia. In two patients with ALL for whom paired diagnosis/relapse samples were available, HIC1 was unmethylated at diagnosis but was highly methylated at relapse after a chemotherapy-induced complete remission. HIC1 methylation, therefore, seems to be a progression event in hematopoietic neoplasms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1678-1681
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Research
Volume57
Issue number9
StatePublished - May 1 1997

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Hematologic Neoplasms
Methylation
Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic Phase
Blast Crisis
Recurrence
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive
Tumor Suppressor Genes
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Bone Marrow Cells
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Blood Cells
Leukemia
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Issa, J. P. J., Zehnbauer, B. A., Kaufmann, S. H., Biel, M. A., & Baylin, S. B. (1997). HIC1 hypermethylation is a late event in hematopoietic neoplasms. Cancer Research, 57(9), 1678-1681.

HIC1 hypermethylation is a late event in hematopoietic neoplasms. / Issa, Jean Pierre J; Zehnbauer, Barbara A.; Kaufmann, Scott H; Biel, Maggie A.; Baylin, Stephen B.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 57, No. 9, 01.05.1997, p. 1678-1681.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Issa, JPJ, Zehnbauer, BA, Kaufmann, SH, Biel, MA & Baylin, SB 1997, 'HIC1 hypermethylation is a late event in hematopoietic neoplasms', Cancer Research, vol. 57, no. 9, pp. 1678-1681.
Issa JPJ, Zehnbauer BA, Kaufmann SH, Biel MA, Baylin SB. HIC1 hypermethylation is a late event in hematopoietic neoplasms. Cancer Research. 1997 May 1;57(9):1678-1681.
Issa, Jean Pierre J ; Zehnbauer, Barbara A. ; Kaufmann, Scott H ; Biel, Maggie A. ; Baylin, Stephen B. / HIC1 hypermethylation is a late event in hematopoietic neoplasms. In: Cancer Research. 1997 ; Vol. 57, No. 9. pp. 1678-1681.
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