Hereditary colorectal cancer

H. T. Lynch, Thomas Christopher Smyrk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The question, 'Is cancer hereditary?' has been answered beyond any doubt through the discovery of germ-line cancer-causing mutations in a subset of colorectal cancers (CRCs). Clearly, this authentication of the role of genetics was not solely dependent on molecular genetic studies, since hereditary cancer syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) had been known for at least 100 years, but molecular advances are clarifying and refining clinical impressions. Have clinicians acted on the importance of hereditary factors in cancer so that this knowledge might be translated into patient benefit? Data showing that 59% of patients with FAP still die of metastatic CRC suggest that the answer is no.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)478-484
Number of pages7
JournalSeminars in Oncology
Volume26
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Colorectal Neoplasms
Adenomatous Polyposis Coli
Hereditary Neoplastic Syndromes
Neoplasms
Germ Cells
Molecular Biology
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Lynch, H. T., & Smyrk, T. C. (1999). Hereditary colorectal cancer. Seminars in Oncology, 26(5), 478-484.

Hereditary colorectal cancer. / Lynch, H. T.; Smyrk, Thomas Christopher.

In: Seminars in Oncology, Vol. 26, No. 5, 1999, p. 478-484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lynch, HT & Smyrk, TC 1999, 'Hereditary colorectal cancer', Seminars in Oncology, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 478-484.
Lynch HT, Smyrk TC. Hereditary colorectal cancer. Seminars in Oncology. 1999;26(5):478-484.
Lynch, H. T. ; Smyrk, Thomas Christopher. / Hereditary colorectal cancer. In: Seminars in Oncology. 1999 ; Vol. 26, No. 5. pp. 478-484.
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