Hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplant: Donation after cardiac death donor vs donation after brain death donor grafts

David D. Lee, Ricardo Paz-Fumagalli, Kristopher Croome, Diego Paz, Lauren Wright, Justin H. Nguyen, C. Burcin Taner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Hepatic artery stenosis (HAS) after liver transplant (LT) is a source of significant morbidity. Some reports have suggested higher arterial complications in patients who receive donation after cardiac death (DCD) livers. Methods: A total of 2860 consecutive LT were reviewed from a prospectively collected database. All angiograms performed in LT recipients were reviewed and primary patency rates determined by need for further intervention or graft loss due to HAT. Results: Hepatic artery stenosis was seen in 4.6% of DCD and donation after brain death (DBD) recipients. Recipient male gender, age at transplant, complex donor hepatic artery anatomy, and prolonged operative time were all associated with HAS, but not DCD status. While HAS in recipients of DCD grafts required more stents (1.7% vs 0.6%, P = 0.04) and had worse primary patency rates (logrank, P = 0.02), outcomes as defined by HAT, patient and graft survival were not significantly different between the recipients of DCD or DBD grafts. Conclusion: We observed no significant difference in the incidence of hepatic artery complications, patient survival, or graft survival in recipients of DCD or DBD grafts. However, HAS in DCD recipients had worse primary patency and a higher need for stent placement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13413
JournalClinical Transplantation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • donation after cardiac death
  • hepatic artery complications
  • liver transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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