Hepatic angiosarcoma mimicking sinusoidal obstruction syndrome/ venoocclusive disease: A pathologic-radiologic correlation

Homer O. Wiland, Rish Pai, Andrei S. Purysko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present a case of a 63-year-old man with liver dysfunction and biopsy findings of venoocclusive disease (VOD) who, at autopsy, was discovered to have multifocal hepatic angiosarcoma. After double lung transplantation, he initially presented with signs of liver failure and portal hypertension resulting in recurrent high-volume ascites. Clinically, VOD was considered, and tacrolimus was discontinued, due to its known association with VOD. This, however, did not result in clinical improvement, and computed tomography eventually revealed the development of multiple low-attenuating hepatic lesions over the course of several months. Biopsies of the masses and background liver demonstrated changes most consistent with VOD, characterized by sinusoidal congestion affecting the centrilobular areas with associated hepatocyte atrophy and dropout. A reticulin stain highlighted deposition of reticulin fibers within the sinusoids and central veins. Scattered sinusoidal atypical cells were identified; however, a definitive diagnosis of malignancy was not possible. He eventually passed away because of complications of liver disease. At autopsy, there were multiple firm, red-brown masses identified throughout both hepatic lobes. Upon histologic review, the masses were shown to be angiosarcoma. Away from the tumor, the liver also demonstrated features of VOD. It is likely that the histologic appearance of VOD in the background liver probably represents secondary changes due to injury to the hepatic sinusoids by the primary malignancy. We conclude that it is necessary to consider the possibility of unsampled vascular malignancy when hepatic masses are identified on imaging and histology is consistent with VOD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-279
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Diagnostic Pathology
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease
Hemangiosarcoma
Liver
Reticulin
Liver Diseases
Autopsy
Neoplasms
Biopsy
Lung Transplantation
Liver Failure
Portal Hypertension
Tacrolimus
Ascites
Atrophy
Blood Vessels
Hepatocytes
Veins
Histology
Coloring Agents
Tomography

Keywords

  • Angiosarcoma
  • sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS)
  • Venoocclusive disease
  • venoocclusive disease (VOD)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Hepatic angiosarcoma mimicking sinusoidal obstruction syndrome/ venoocclusive disease : A pathologic-radiologic correlation. / Wiland, Homer O.; Pai, Rish; Purysko, Andrei S.

In: Annals of Diagnostic Pathology, Vol. 16, No. 4, 01.08.2012, p. 275-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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