Hemostatic gene polymorphisms and the prevalence of thrombotic complications in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia

Vahid Afshar-Kharghan, José A. López, Leigh A. Gray, Arnoldo Padilla, Gautam Borthakur, Stacy C. Roberts, Rajiv K. Pruthi, Ayalew Tefferi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patients with polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia are at risk for thrombotic and bleeding complications. Currently, no diagnostic test can predict thrombohemorrhagic complications. In a prospective study of 86 patients with polycythemia vera (43 patients) or essential thrombocythemia (43 patients), we examined the possible role of polymorphisms of platelet adhesion receptors [glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, GPIa, GPIIIa) and clotting factor II (prothrombin's G20210A mutation) and clotting factor V (Leiden mutation) in determining the risk of thrombotic or bleeding complications. Except for an association between vasomotor symptoms and prothrombin mutation (P < 0.001), no significant correlation between polymorphism of clotting factors and thrombohemorrhagic complications was identified. When the entire patient cohort was considered, the polymorphisms of platelet adhesion receptors were not associated with the risk for thrombotic or bleeding complications. However, among patients with polycythemia vera, the presence of the PIA2 allele of GPIIIa was associated with an increased risk of arterial thrombosis. In view of previous studies linking the presence of the PIA2 allele of GPIIIa to a higher risk for coronary artery thrombosis, our data have physiologic relevance. However, they need to be confirmed in a larger study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-24
Number of pages4
JournalBlood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Keywords

  • Essential thrombocythemla
  • Factor II
  • Factor V
  • Platelet glycoprotein
  • Polycythemia vera

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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