Health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease after pallidotomy and deep brain stimulation

Kristy Straits-Tröster, Julie A Fields, Steven B. Wilkinson, Rajesh Pahwa, Kelly E. Lyons, William C. Koller, Alexander I. Tröster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored the multidimensional outcome of three neurosurgical interventions for Parkinson's disease (PD): pallidotomy (N = 23), pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS) (N = 9), and thalamic DBS (N = 7). All patients completed the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Beck Depression Inventory. Pallidotomy patients also completed the Profile of Mood States, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and a disease-specific quality of life (QOL) measure, the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). Three months after surgery, all neurosurgical groups showed significant improvements in mood and function, including physical, psychosocial, and overall functioning. Pallidal DBS and pallidotomy patients who completed additional QOL measures reported decreased anxiety and tension, increased vigor, improved mobility and ability to perform activities of daily living, and decreased perceived stigma. Psychosocial dysfunction scores from the SIP were related to depressed mood both at baseline (r = .42) and at followup (r = .45), but the physical dysfunction subscale was not related to mood at either time point, suggesting that disruption of social relationships due to PD may have more impact on affective distress than physical symptoms alone. Results suggest that neurosurgical interventions for PD improve disabling PD motor symptoms and also improve several domains of quality of life. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-416
Number of pages18
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pallidotomy
Deep Brain Stimulation
Parkinson Disease
Quality of Life
Sickness Impact Profile
Anxiety
Equipment and Supplies
Aptitude
Activities of Daily Living
Parkinson's Disease
Health
Depression
Mood
Physical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Straits-Tröster, K., Fields, J. A., Wilkinson, S. B., Pahwa, R., Lyons, K. E., Koller, W. C., & Tröster, A. I. (2000). Health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease after pallidotomy and deep brain stimulation. Brain and Cognition, 42(3), 399-416. https://doi.org/10.1006/brcg.1999.1112

Health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease after pallidotomy and deep brain stimulation. / Straits-Tröster, Kristy; Fields, Julie A; Wilkinson, Steven B.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Lyons, Kelly E.; Koller, William C.; Tröster, Alexander I.

In: Brain and Cognition, Vol. 42, No. 3, 04.2000, p. 399-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Straits-Tröster, K, Fields, JA, Wilkinson, SB, Pahwa, R, Lyons, KE, Koller, WC & Tröster, AI 2000, 'Health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease after pallidotomy and deep brain stimulation', Brain and Cognition, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 399-416. https://doi.org/10.1006/brcg.1999.1112
Straits-Tröster, Kristy ; Fields, Julie A ; Wilkinson, Steven B. ; Pahwa, Rajesh ; Lyons, Kelly E. ; Koller, William C. ; Tröster, Alexander I. / Health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease after pallidotomy and deep brain stimulation. In: Brain and Cognition. 2000 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 399-416.
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