Health Information-Seeking on Behalf of Others: Characteristics of “Surrogate Seekers”

Sarah L. Cutrona, Kathleen M. Mazor, Sana N. Vieux, Tana M. Luger, Julie E. Volkman, Lila J Rutten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the behaviors of surrogate seekers (those who seek health information for others) may guide efforts to improve health information transmission. We used 2011–2012 data from the Health Information National Trends Survey to describe behaviors of online surrogate seekers. Respondents were asked about use of the Internet for surrogate-seeking over the prior 12 months. Data were weighted to calculate population estimates. Two thirds (66.6 %) reported surrogate-seeking. Compared to those who sought health information online for only themselves, surrogate seekers were more likely to live in households with others (weighted percent 89.4 vs. 82.5 % of self-seekers; p < 0.05); no significant differences in sex, race, income or education were observed. Surrogate seekers were more likely to report activities requiring user-generated content: email communication with healthcare providers; visits to social networking sites to read and share about medical topics and participation in online health support groups. On multivariate analysis, those who had looked online for healthcare providers were more likely to be surrogate seekers (OR 1.67, 95 % CI 1.08–2.59). In addition to seeking health information, surrogate seekers create and pass along communications that may influence medical care decisions. Research is needed to identify ways to facilitate transmission of accurate health information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-19
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Health
Health Personnel
Communication
Social Networking
Self-Help Groups
Sex Characteristics
Internet
Multivariate Analysis
Education
Research
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Caregiver
  • Health information-seeking
  • Internet
  • Peer group
  • Social network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Oncology

Cite this

Health Information-Seeking on Behalf of Others : Characteristics of “Surrogate Seekers”. / Cutrona, Sarah L.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Vieux, Sana N.; Luger, Tana M.; Volkman, Julie E.; Rutten, Lila J.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 30, No. 1, 2015, p. 12-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cutrona, Sarah L. ; Mazor, Kathleen M. ; Vieux, Sana N. ; Luger, Tana M. ; Volkman, Julie E. ; Rutten, Lila J. / Health Information-Seeking on Behalf of Others : Characteristics of “Surrogate Seekers”. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 12-19.
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