Health Habits of Employees in a Large Medical Center

Time Trends and Impact of a Worksite Wellness Facility

Abd Moain Abu Dabrh, Archana Gorty, Sarah M. Jenkins, Mohammad H Murad, Donald D. Hensrud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Worksite health interventions are not novel but their effect remains subject of debate. We examined employer-based wellness program to determine health habits trends, and compare prevalence estimates to national data. We conducted serial surveys (1996 and 2007-10) to employees of a large medical center that included questions measuring outcomes, including obesity, regular exercise, cardiovascular activity, and smoking status. Logistic regression models were estimated to compare data by membership across years, considering p-values ≤ 0.01 as statistically significant. 3,206 employees responded (Response rates 59-68%). Obesity prevalence increased over time in members and nonmembers of the wellness facility, consistent with national trends. Members had a lower prevalence of cigarette smoking compared to nonmembers (overall year-adjusted odds ratio 0.66, P <0.001). Further, employees had a lower prevalence of cigarette smoking (9.7 vs. 17.3% in 2010, P <0.001) compared with national data. Wellness facility membership was associated with increased regular exercise and cardiovascular exercise (P <0.001) compared to nonmembers. In summary, working in a medical center was associated with a decreased prevalence of cigarette smoking, but not with lower prevalence of obesity. Worksite wellness facility membership was associated with increased exercise and decreased cigarette smoking. Employer-based interventions may be effective in improving some health behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number20804
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 11 2016

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Occupational Health
Workplace
Habits
Smoking
Obesity
Logistic Models
Health Behavior
Health
Health Promotion
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Health Habits of Employees in a Large Medical Center : Time Trends and Impact of a Worksite Wellness Facility. / Abu Dabrh, Abd Moain; Gorty, Archana; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Murad, Mohammad H; Hensrud, Donald D.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, 20804, 11.02.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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