Head trauma and in vivo measures of amyloid and neurodegeneration in a population-based study

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Abstract

Objectives: We determined whether head trauma was associated with amyloid deposition and neurodegeneration among individuals who were cognitively normal (CN) or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Participants included 448 CN individuals and 141 individuals with MCI from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging who underwent Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET, fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, and MRI. Head trauma was defined as a self-reported brain injury with at least momentary loss of consciousness or memory. Regression models examined whether head trauma was associated with each neuroimaging variable (assessed as continuous and dichotomous measures) in both CN and MCI participants, controlling for age and sex. Results: Among 448 CN individuals, 74 (17%) self-reported a head trauma. There was no difference in any neuroimaging measure between CN subjects with and without head trauma. Of 141 participants with MCI, 25 (18%) self-reported a head trauma. MCI participants with a head trauma had higher amyloid levels (by an average 0.36 standardized uptake value ratio units, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Among individuals with MCI, but not CN individuals, self-reported head trauma with at least momentary loss of consciousness or memory was associated with greater amyloid deposition, suggesting that head trauma may be associated with Alzheimer disease-related neuropathology. Differencesbetween CN individuals and individuals with MCI raise questions about the relevance of head injury-PET abnormality findings in those with MCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-76
Number of pages7
JournalNeurology
Volume82
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 7 2014

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Craniocerebral Trauma
Amyloid
Population
Unconsciousness
Neuroimaging
Trauma
Mild Cognitive Impairment
Cognitive Dysfunction
Brain Injuries
Alzheimer Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "Head trauma and in vivo measures of amyloid and neurodegeneration in a population-based study",
abstract = "Objectives: We determined whether head trauma was associated with amyloid deposition and neurodegeneration among individuals who were cognitively normal (CN) or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Participants included 448 CN individuals and 141 individuals with MCI from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging who underwent Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET, fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, and MRI. Head trauma was defined as a self-reported brain injury with at least momentary loss of consciousness or memory. Regression models examined whether head trauma was associated with each neuroimaging variable (assessed as continuous and dichotomous measures) in both CN and MCI participants, controlling for age and sex. Results: Among 448 CN individuals, 74 (17{\%}) self-reported a head trauma. There was no difference in any neuroimaging measure between CN subjects with and without head trauma. Of 141 participants with MCI, 25 (18{\%}) self-reported a head trauma. MCI participants with a head trauma had higher amyloid levels (by an average 0.36 standardized uptake value ratio units, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Among individuals with MCI, but not CN individuals, self-reported head trauma with at least momentary loss of consciousness or memory was associated with greater amyloid deposition, suggesting that head trauma may be associated with Alzheimer disease-related neuropathology. Differencesbetween CN individuals and individuals with MCI raise questions about the relevance of head injury-PET abnormality findings in those with MCI.",
author = "Mielke, {Michelle M} and Rodolfo Savica and Wiste, {Heather J.} and Weigand, {Stephen D.} and Vemuri, {Prashanthi D} and Knopman, {David S} and Val Lowe and Roberts, {Rosebud O} and Machulda, {Mary Margaret} and Geda, {Yonas Endale} and Petersen, {Ronald Carl} and Jack, {Clifford R Jr.}",
year = "2014",
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T1 - Head trauma and in vivo measures of amyloid and neurodegeneration in a population-based study

AU - Mielke, Michelle M

AU - Savica, Rodolfo

AU - Wiste, Heather J.

AU - Weigand, Stephen D.

AU - Vemuri, Prashanthi D

AU - Knopman, David S

AU - Lowe, Val

AU - Roberts, Rosebud O

AU - Machulda, Mary Margaret

AU - Geda, Yonas Endale

AU - Petersen, Ronald Carl

AU - Jack, Clifford R Jr.

PY - 2014/1/7

Y1 - 2014/1/7

N2 - Objectives: We determined whether head trauma was associated with amyloid deposition and neurodegeneration among individuals who were cognitively normal (CN) or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Participants included 448 CN individuals and 141 individuals with MCI from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging who underwent Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET, fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, and MRI. Head trauma was defined as a self-reported brain injury with at least momentary loss of consciousness or memory. Regression models examined whether head trauma was associated with each neuroimaging variable (assessed as continuous and dichotomous measures) in both CN and MCI participants, controlling for age and sex. Results: Among 448 CN individuals, 74 (17%) self-reported a head trauma. There was no difference in any neuroimaging measure between CN subjects with and without head trauma. Of 141 participants with MCI, 25 (18%) self-reported a head trauma. MCI participants with a head trauma had higher amyloid levels (by an average 0.36 standardized uptake value ratio units, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Among individuals with MCI, but not CN individuals, self-reported head trauma with at least momentary loss of consciousness or memory was associated with greater amyloid deposition, suggesting that head trauma may be associated with Alzheimer disease-related neuropathology. Differencesbetween CN individuals and individuals with MCI raise questions about the relevance of head injury-PET abnormality findings in those with MCI.

AB - Objectives: We determined whether head trauma was associated with amyloid deposition and neurodegeneration among individuals who were cognitively normal (CN) or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Participants included 448 CN individuals and 141 individuals with MCI from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging who underwent Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET, fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, and MRI. Head trauma was defined as a self-reported brain injury with at least momentary loss of consciousness or memory. Regression models examined whether head trauma was associated with each neuroimaging variable (assessed as continuous and dichotomous measures) in both CN and MCI participants, controlling for age and sex. Results: Among 448 CN individuals, 74 (17%) self-reported a head trauma. There was no difference in any neuroimaging measure between CN subjects with and without head trauma. Of 141 participants with MCI, 25 (18%) self-reported a head trauma. MCI participants with a head trauma had higher amyloid levels (by an average 0.36 standardized uptake value ratio units, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Among individuals with MCI, but not CN individuals, self-reported head trauma with at least momentary loss of consciousness or memory was associated with greater amyloid deposition, suggesting that head trauma may be associated with Alzheimer disease-related neuropathology. Differencesbetween CN individuals and individuals with MCI raise questions about the relevance of head injury-PET abnormality findings in those with MCI.

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