Golgi sulfation of the oligosaccharide chain of Po occurs in the presence of myelin assembly but not in its absence

Joseph F. Poduslo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To decipher the intracellular targeting mechanism by which the major glycoprotein of peripheral nerve myelin, Po, is delivered to myelin after crush injury, as well as to the lysosome after permanent transection injury of the sciatic nerve - experimental paradigms characterized by the presence and absence of axonal regeneration and subsequent myelin assembly, respectively - the role of sulfation of Po was investigated. Po sulfation is shown to occur within the Golgi apparatus as a post-translational modification of the oligosaccharide chain which is dependent on processing beyond the action of mannosidase I. It is associated with myelination as observed during development and after crush injury, but does not occur after transection injury, even in the presence of the mannosidase II inhibitor, swainsonine, or the lysosomotrophic agent, L-methionine methyl ester. Although Po accumulation can be demonstrated with both agents when other precursors are used (e.g. fucose, mannose, amino acids) and indicates lysosomal targeting and delivery of Po after the action of GIcNAc transferase I, the absence of Po sulfation after transection suggests that the lack of this modification may result in a default mechanism for lysosomal targeting after nerve transection. Lysosomal degradation of Po was evaluated after crush injury by pulse-chase analyses with 35SO4 and [3H] mannose in the presence and absence of chlorate, an inhibitor of ATP-sulfarylase. Although Po sulfation of the oligosaccharide chain is a stable modification whose labeling is dramatically inhibited by chlorate, no decrease in mannose-labeled Po was seen with chlorate even with prolonged chase times. Because of this lack of degradation of mannose-labeled Po in the presence of chlorate in the crushed nerve, it is concluded that the absence of Po sulfation does not result in a default mechanism for lysosomal delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3719-3725
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume265
Issue number7
StatePublished - Mar 5 1990

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Chlorates
Mannose
Myelin Sheath
Oligosaccharides
mannosyl-oligosaccharide 1,2-alpha-mannosidase
Swainsonine
Degradation
Fucose
Wounds and Injuries
Golgi Apparatus
Sciatic Nerve
Post Translational Protein Processing
Transferases
Lysosomes
Peripheral Nerves
Labeling
Regeneration
Glycoproteins
Adenosine Triphosphate
Amino Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

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Golgi sulfation of the oligosaccharide chain of Po occurs in the presence of myelin assembly but not in its absence. / Poduslo, Joseph F.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 265, No. 7, 05.03.1990, p. 3719-3725.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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