Glomus jugulare tumor: Tumor control and complications after stereotactic radiosurgery

Robert L. Foote, Bruce E. Pollock, Deborah A. Gorman, Paula J. Schomberg, Scott L. Stafford, Michael J. Link, Robert W. Kline, Scott E. Strome, Jan Kasperbauer, Kerry D. Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background. We evaluated toxicity and long-term efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with symptomatic or progressive glomus jugulare tumors. Methods. Twenty-five consecutive patients (age, 30-88 years; 17 women, 8 men) who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with the Leksell Gamma Knife (dose, 12-18 Gy) were prospectively followed. MRI and clinical examinations were performed at 6 months and 1, 2, and 3 years, and then every 2 years. Results. None of the tumors increased in size, 17 were stable, and 8 decreased (median imaging follow-up, 35 months; range, 10-113 months). Symptoms subsided in 15 patients (60%); vertigo occurred in 1, but balance improved with vestibular training (median clinical follow-up, 37 months; range, 11-118 months). No other new or progressive neuropathy of cranial nerves V-XII developed. Conclusions. Stereotactic radiosurgery can achieve excellent tumor control with low risk of morbidity in the treatment of glomus jugulare tumors. The lower cranial nerves can safely tolerate a radiosurgical dose of 12 to 18 Gy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-338
Number of pages7
JournalHead and Neck
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Glomus Jugulare Tumor
Radiosurgery
Hypoglossal Nerve
Neoplasms
Trigeminal Nerve
Cranial Nerves
Vertigo
Morbidity
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Gamma knife
  • Glomus jugulare tumor
  • Prospective study
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Foote, R. L., Pollock, B. E., Gorman, D. A., Schomberg, P. J., Stafford, S. L., Link, M. J., ... Olsen, K. D. (2002). Glomus jugulare tumor: Tumor control and complications after stereotactic radiosurgery. Head and Neck, 24(4), 332-338. https://doi.org/10.1002/hed.10005

Glomus jugulare tumor : Tumor control and complications after stereotactic radiosurgery. / Foote, Robert L.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Gorman, Deborah A.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Kline, Robert W.; Strome, Scott E.; Kasperbauer, Jan; Olsen, Kerry D.

In: Head and Neck, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2002, p. 332-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Foote, RL, Pollock, BE, Gorman, DA, Schomberg, PJ, Stafford, SL, Link, MJ, Kline, RW, Strome, SE, Kasperbauer, J & Olsen, KD 2002, 'Glomus jugulare tumor: Tumor control and complications after stereotactic radiosurgery', Head and Neck, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 332-338. https://doi.org/10.1002/hed.10005
Foote RL, Pollock BE, Gorman DA, Schomberg PJ, Stafford SL, Link MJ et al. Glomus jugulare tumor: Tumor control and complications after stereotactic radiosurgery. Head and Neck. 2002;24(4):332-338. https://doi.org/10.1002/hed.10005
Foote, Robert L. ; Pollock, Bruce E. ; Gorman, Deborah A. ; Schomberg, Paula J. ; Stafford, Scott L. ; Link, Michael J. ; Kline, Robert W. ; Strome, Scott E. ; Kasperbauer, Jan ; Olsen, Kerry D. / Glomus jugulare tumor : Tumor control and complications after stereotactic radiosurgery. In: Head and Neck. 2002 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 332-338.
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