Genome engineering with TALE and CRISPR systems in neuroscience

Han B. Lee, Brynn N. Sundberg, Ashley N. Sigafoos, Karl J Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent advancement in genome engineering technology is changing the landscape of biological research and providing neuroscientists with an opportunity to develop new methodologies to ask critical research questions. This advancement is highlighted by the increased use of programmable DNA-binding agents (PDBAs) such as transcription activator-like effector (TALE) and RNA-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated (Cas) systems. These PDBAs fused or co-expressed with various effector domains allow precise modification of genomic sequences and gene expression levels. These technologies mirror and extend beyond classic gene targeting methods contributing to the development of novel tools for basic and clinical neuroscience. In this Review, we discuss the recent development in genome engineering and potential applications of this technology in the field of neuroscience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number47
JournalFrontiers in Genetics
Volume7
Issue numberAPR
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 6 2016

Fingerprint

Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats
Neurosciences
Genome
Technology
Gene Targeting
DNA
Research
RNA
Gene Expression
Transcription Activator-Like Effectors

Keywords

  • Cas9
  • CRISPR
  • Genome engineering
  • Neuroscience
  • TALE
  • TALEN
  • ZFN

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Genome engineering with TALE and CRISPR systems in neuroscience. / Lee, Han B.; Sundberg, Brynn N.; Sigafoos, Ashley N.; Clark, Karl J.

In: Frontiers in Genetics, Vol. 7, No. APR, 47, 06.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Han B. ; Sundberg, Brynn N. ; Sigafoos, Ashley N. ; Clark, Karl J. / Genome engineering with TALE and CRISPR systems in neuroscience. In: Frontiers in Genetics. 2016 ; Vol. 7, No. APR.
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