Genetic analysis of early- versus late-stage ovarian tumors

Vijayalakshmi Shridhar, J. Lee, A. Pandita, S. Iturria, R. Avula, J. Staub, M. Morrissey, Fergus J Couch, David I Smith, K. Kalli, G. Keeney, Gary Keeney, William Arthur Cliby, K. Lu, R. Schmandt, G. B. Mills, Jr Bast R.C., C. D. James, F. J. Couch, L. C. HartmannJ. Lillie, D. I. Smith

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Abstract

In the United States, ovarian cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related deaths among women. The most important prognostic factor for this cancer is tumor stage, or extent of disease at diagnosis. Although women with low-stage tumors have a relatively good prognosis, most women diagnosed with late-stage disease eventually succumb to their cancer. In an attempt to understand early events in ovarian carcinogenesis, and to explore steps in its progression, we have applied multiple molecular genetic techniques to the analysis of 21 early-stage (stage I/II) and 17 advanced-stage (stage III/IV) ovarian tumors. These techniques included expression profiling with cDNA microarrays containing approximately 18,000 expressed sequences, and comparative genomic hybridization to address the chromosomal locations of copy number gains as well as losses. Results from the analysis indicate that early-stage ovarian cancers exhibit profound alterations in gene expression, many of which are similar to those identified in late-stage tumors. However, differences observed at the genomic level suggest differences between the early- and late-stage tumors and provide support for a progression model for ovarian cancer development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5895-5904
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Research
Volume61
Issue number15
StatePublished - Aug 1 2001

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Neoplasms
Ovarian Neoplasms
Genetic Techniques
Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Molecular Biology
Carcinogenesis
Gene Expression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Shridhar, V., Lee, J., Pandita, A., Iturria, S., Avula, R., Staub, J., ... Smith, D. I. (2001). Genetic analysis of early- versus late-stage ovarian tumors. Cancer Research, 61(15), 5895-5904.

Genetic analysis of early- versus late-stage ovarian tumors. / Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Lee, J.; Pandita, A.; Iturria, S.; Avula, R.; Staub, J.; Morrissey, M.; Couch, Fergus J; Smith, David I; Kalli, K.; Keeney, G.; Keeney, Gary; Cliby, William Arthur; Lu, K.; Schmandt, R.; Mills, G. B.; Bast R.C., Jr; James, C. D.; Couch, F. J.; Hartmann, L. C.; Lillie, J.; Smith, D. I.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 61, No. 15, 01.08.2001, p. 5895-5904.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shridhar, V, Lee, J, Pandita, A, Iturria, S, Avula, R, Staub, J, Morrissey, M, Couch, FJ, Smith, DI, Kalli, K, Keeney, G, Keeney, G, Cliby, WA, Lu, K, Schmandt, R, Mills, GB, Bast R.C., J, James, CD, Couch, FJ, Hartmann, LC, Lillie, J & Smith, DI 2001, 'Genetic analysis of early- versus late-stage ovarian tumors', Cancer Research, vol. 61, no. 15, pp. 5895-5904.
Shridhar V, Lee J, Pandita A, Iturria S, Avula R, Staub J et al. Genetic analysis of early- versus late-stage ovarian tumors. Cancer Research. 2001 Aug 1;61(15):5895-5904.
Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi ; Lee, J. ; Pandita, A. ; Iturria, S. ; Avula, R. ; Staub, J. ; Morrissey, M. ; Couch, Fergus J ; Smith, David I ; Kalli, K. ; Keeney, G. ; Keeney, Gary ; Cliby, William Arthur ; Lu, K. ; Schmandt, R. ; Mills, G. B. ; Bast R.C., Jr ; James, C. D. ; Couch, F. J. ; Hartmann, L. C. ; Lillie, J. ; Smith, D. I. / Genetic analysis of early- versus late-stage ovarian tumors. In: Cancer Research. 2001 ; Vol. 61, No. 15. pp. 5895-5904.
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