Gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

J. N. Gouze, S. C. Ghivizzani, E. Gouze, G. D. Palmer, O. B. Betz, P. D. Robbins, Christopher H Evans, J. H. Herndon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in understanding the biology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have opened new therapeutic avenues. One of these, gene therapy, involves the delivery to patients of genes encoding anti-arthritic proteins. This approach has shown efficacy in animal models of RA, and the first human, phase I trial has just been successfully completed. Hand surgery featured prominently in this pioneering study, as a potentially anti-arthritic gene encoding the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was transferred to the metacarpophalangeal joints of subjects with RA one week before total joint arthroplasty. This study has confirmed that it is possible to transfer genes safely to human joints. It should pave the way for additional application of gene therapy to arthritis and other orthopaedic conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-219
Number of pages9
JournalHand surgery : an international journal devoted to hand and upper limb surgery and related research : journal of the Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand
Volume6
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Genetic Therapy
Arthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Joints
Genes
Metacarpophalangeal Joint
Interleukin-1 Receptors
Arthroplasty
Orthopedics
Animal Models
Hand
Proteins
Therapeutics

Cite this

Gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. / Gouze, J. N.; Ghivizzani, S. C.; Gouze, E.; Palmer, G. D.; Betz, O. B.; Robbins, P. D.; Evans, Christopher H; Herndon, J. H.

In: Hand surgery : an international journal devoted to hand and upper limb surgery and related research : journal of the Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand, Vol. 6, No. 2, 2001, p. 211-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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