Gender-role differences in decision-making orientations and decision-making skills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between gender role identification and decision making orientations was examined. Decision making was analyzed in terms of decision making orientation (behavioral, cognitive, and emotional) and decision making skills (problem definition and formulation, generation of alternative solutions, choice process, solution implementation, and verification). The results revealed a 2-factor characterization of general decision making in terms of approach-avoidance tendencies and self-appraisals of decision skills. A masculinity model was supported for decision making orientation, with masculinity serving as the only significant predictor. In contrast, an androgyny model was supported for decision making skills, with masculinity and femininity serving as significant predictors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-94
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume26
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Decision Making
Masculinity
Femininity
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Research Design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Gender-role differences in decision-making orientations and decision-making skills. / Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen; Jaccard, James.

In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 76-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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