Gender-related differences in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

Gail L. Kongable, Giuseppe Lanzino, Teresa P. Germanson, Laura L. Truskowski, Wayne M. Alves, James C. Torner, Neal F. Kassell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

138 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Female gender is recognized risk factor for the occurrence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the present study the authors analyzed differences in admission characteristics and outcome between 578 women (64%) and 328 men (36%) who were enrolled in a recently completed clinical trial. The female-to-male ratio was nearly 2:1. The women in this study were older than the men (mean age 51.4 years vs. 47.3 years, respectively, p < 0.001). Female patients harbored aneurysms of the internal carotid artery more frequently than male patients (36.8% vs. 18.0%, p < 0.001) and more often had multiple aneurysms) 32.4% vs. 17.6%, p < 0.001). On the other hand, anterior cerebral artery aneurysms were more commonly encountered in men (46.1% in men vs. 26.6% in women, p < 0.001). Other baseline prognostic factors were balanced between the gender group. Surgery was performed equally in both sexes (98%), although the time to operation was shorter for women (mean 3.6 day for women vs. 5.3 days for mean, p = 0.0002). In the placebo group, the occurrence of vasospasm was not statistically different between the two groups. Primary causes of death and disability were the same, and favorable outcome rates at 3 months were not statistically different between the genders (69.7% for women vs. 73.4% for men, p = 0.243). The odds of a favorable outcome in women versus one in men were not statistically significant either before or after adjustment for age. These observations lead the authors to suggest that although women are older and harbor more aneurysms, the 3-month outcome for women and men who experience aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is the same.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-48
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume84
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Aneurysm
Intracranial Aneurysm
Internal Carotid Artery
Cause of Death
Placebos
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • aneurysm
  • gender
  • subarachnoid hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Kongable, G. L., Lanzino, G., Germanson, T. P., Truskowski, L. L., Alves, W. M., Torner, J. C., & Kassell, N. F. (1996). Gender-related differences in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Journal of Neurosurgery, 84(1), 43-48.

Gender-related differences in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. / Kongable, Gail L.; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Germanson, Teresa P.; Truskowski, Laura L.; Alves, Wayne M.; Torner, James C.; Kassell, Neal F.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 84, No. 1, 01.1996, p. 43-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kongable, GL, Lanzino, G, Germanson, TP, Truskowski, LL, Alves, WM, Torner, JC & Kassell, NF 1996, 'Gender-related differences in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 43-48.
Kongable GL, Lanzino G, Germanson TP, Truskowski LL, Alves WM, Torner JC et al. Gender-related differences in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Journal of Neurosurgery. 1996 Jan;84(1):43-48.
Kongable, Gail L. ; Lanzino, Giuseppe ; Germanson, Teresa P. ; Truskowski, Laura L. ; Alves, Wayne M. ; Torner, James C. ; Kassell, Neal F. / Gender-related differences in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1996 ; Vol. 84, No. 1. pp. 43-48.
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