Functional genomic screen reveals genes involved in lipid-droplet formation and utilization

Yi D Guo, Tobias C. Walther, Meghana Rao, Nico Stuurman, Gohta Goshima, Koji Terayama, Jinny S. Wong, Ronald D. Vale, Peter Walter, Robert V. Farese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

446 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eukaryotic cells store neutral lipids in cytoplasmic lipid droplets enclosed in a monolayer of phospholipids and associated proteins. These dynamic organelles serve as the principal reservoirs for storing cellular energy and for the building blocks for membrane lipids. Excessive lipid accumulation in cells is a central feature of obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis, yet remarkably little is known about lipid-droplet cell biology. Here we show, by means of a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila S2 cells that about 1.5% of all genes function in lipid-droplet formation and regulation. The phenotypes of the gene knockdowns sorted into five distinct phenotypic classes. Genes encoding enzymes of phospholipid biosynthesis proved to be determinants of lipid-droplet size and number, suggesting that the phospholipid composition of the monolayer profoundly affects droplet morphology and lipid utilization. A subset of the Arf1-COPI vesicular transport proteins also regulated droplet morphology and lipid utilization, thereby identifying a previously unrecognized function for this machinery. These phenotypes are conserved in mammalian cells, suggesting that insights from these studies are likely to be central to our understanding of human diseases involving excessive lipid storage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)657-661
Number of pages5
JournalNature
Volume453
Issue number7195
DOIs
StatePublished - May 29 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Genes
Phospholipids
Lipids
Vesicular Transport Proteins
Coat Protein Complex I
Gene Knockdown Techniques
Phenotype
Abdominal Obesity
Eukaryotic Cells
Membrane Lipids
RNA Interference
Organelles
Drosophila
Cell Biology
Lipid Droplets
Atherosclerosis
Genome
Enzymes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Guo, Y. D., Walther, T. C., Rao, M., Stuurman, N., Goshima, G., Terayama, K., ... Farese, R. V. (2008). Functional genomic screen reveals genes involved in lipid-droplet formation and utilization. Nature, 453(7195), 657-661. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06928

Functional genomic screen reveals genes involved in lipid-droplet formation and utilization. / Guo, Yi D; Walther, Tobias C.; Rao, Meghana; Stuurman, Nico; Goshima, Gohta; Terayama, Koji; Wong, Jinny S.; Vale, Ronald D.; Walter, Peter; Farese, Robert V.

In: Nature, Vol. 453, No. 7195, 29.05.2008, p. 657-661.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guo, YD, Walther, TC, Rao, M, Stuurman, N, Goshima, G, Terayama, K, Wong, JS, Vale, RD, Walter, P & Farese, RV 2008, 'Functional genomic screen reveals genes involved in lipid-droplet formation and utilization', Nature, vol. 453, no. 7195, pp. 657-661. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06928
Guo YD, Walther TC, Rao M, Stuurman N, Goshima G, Terayama K et al. Functional genomic screen reveals genes involved in lipid-droplet formation and utilization. Nature. 2008 May 29;453(7195):657-661. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06928
Guo, Yi D ; Walther, Tobias C. ; Rao, Meghana ; Stuurman, Nico ; Goshima, Gohta ; Terayama, Koji ; Wong, Jinny S. ; Vale, Ronald D. ; Walter, Peter ; Farese, Robert V. / Functional genomic screen reveals genes involved in lipid-droplet formation and utilization. In: Nature. 2008 ; Vol. 453, No. 7195. pp. 657-661.
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