From cloning to structure, function, and regulation of chloride-dependent and independent bicarbonate transporters

Michael F Romero, Min Hwang Chang, David B. Mount

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter deals with regulation of chloride-dependent and independent bicarbonate transporters. Regulation of acid-base homeostasis as well as other ionic concentrations, such as Na+, is critical for animal life. Vertebrates, mammals in particular, generate significant amounts of acid via metabolism; these organisms must excrete acid (H+) or increase systemic HCO3 concentration to buffer this metabolic acid. Bicarbonate, along with CO2, is the major pH buffering system of biological fluids. The chapter also defines the modes of membrane anion transport. Membranes present a barrier to the movement of ions and other solutes. The cell membrane is a mosaic of phospholipids, cholesterol and proteins. The phospholipids make the bulk of the membrane and form a bilayer. This lipid bilayer has the hydrophilic phosphate and sugar head-groups facing both the outside world and the inside world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPhysiology and Pathology of chloride transporters and channels in the nervous system
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages43-79
Number of pages37
ISBN (Print)9780123743732
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Cloning
Bicarbonates
Organism Cloning
Chlorides
Membranes
Acids
Phospholipids
Sugar Phosphates
Lipid bilayers
Mammals
Lipid Bilayers
Cell membranes
Metabolism
Anions
Vertebrates
Buffers
Animals
Homeostasis
Cholesterol
Cell Membrane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Romero, M. F., Chang, M. H., & Mount, D. B. (2010). From cloning to structure, function, and regulation of chloride-dependent and independent bicarbonate transporters. In Physiology and Pathology of chloride transporters and channels in the nervous system (pp. 43-79). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-374373-2.00004-2

From cloning to structure, function, and regulation of chloride-dependent and independent bicarbonate transporters. / Romero, Michael F; Chang, Min Hwang; Mount, David B.

Physiology and Pathology of chloride transporters and channels in the nervous system. Elsevier Inc., 2010. p. 43-79.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Romero, MF, Chang, MH & Mount, DB 2010, From cloning to structure, function, and regulation of chloride-dependent and independent bicarbonate transporters. in Physiology and Pathology of chloride transporters and channels in the nervous system. Elsevier Inc., pp. 43-79. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-374373-2.00004-2
Romero MF, Chang MH, Mount DB. From cloning to structure, function, and regulation of chloride-dependent and independent bicarbonate transporters. In Physiology and Pathology of chloride transporters and channels in the nervous system. Elsevier Inc. 2010. p. 43-79 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-374373-2.00004-2
Romero, Michael F ; Chang, Min Hwang ; Mount, David B. / From cloning to structure, function, and regulation of chloride-dependent and independent bicarbonate transporters. Physiology and Pathology of chloride transporters and channels in the nervous system. Elsevier Inc., 2010. pp. 43-79
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