Frequent periodic leg movement during sleep is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and adverse cardiovascular outcomes

Mahek Mirza, Win Kuang Shen, Aamir Sofi, Ahad Jehangir, Naoyo Mori, A. Jamil Tajik, Arshad Jahangir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Sleep disturbance caused by obstructive sleep apnea is recognized as a contributing factor to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the effect of restless legs syndrome, another common cause of fragmented sleep, on cardiac structure, function, and long-term outcomes is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of frequent leg movement during sleep on cardiac structure and outcomes in patients with restless legs syndrome. Methods: In our retrospective study, patients with restless legs syndrome referred for polysomnography were divided into those with frequent (periodic movement index > 35/hour) and infrequent (≤35/hour) leg movement during sleep. Long-term outcomes were determined using Kaplan-Meier and logistic regression models. Results: Of 584 patients, 47% had a periodic movement index > 35/hour. Despite similarly preserved left ventricular ejection fraction, the group with periodic movement index > 35/hour had significantly higher left ventricular mass and mass index, reflective of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). There were no significant baseline differences in the proportion of patients with hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, prior myocardial infarction, stroke or heart failure, or the use of antihypertensive medications between the groups. Patients with frequent periodic movement index were older, predominantly male, and had more prevalent coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. However, on multivariate analysis, periodic movement index > 35/hour remained the strongest predictor of LVH (odds ratio, 2.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.67-3.59; P <.001). Advanced age, female sex, and apnea-hypopnea index were other predictors of LVH. Patients with periodic movement index > 35/hour had significantly higher rates of heart failure and mortality over median 33-month follow-up. Conclusions: Frequent periodic leg movement during sleep is an independent predictor of severe LVH and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)783-790
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Keywords

  • Left ventricular hypertrophy
  • Periodic limb movement disorder
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Sleep
  • Sleep apnea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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