Free-tissue transfer in patients with peripheral vascular disease: A 10-year experience

Steven Lawrence Moran, Karl A. Illig, Richard M. Green, Joseph M. Serletti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in free-tissue transfer have allowed for lower limb salvage in patients with significant peripheral vascular disease and limb-threatening soft-tissue wounds. The authors retrospectively reviewed their 10-year experience with free flaps for limb salvage in patients with peripheral vascular disease to assess postoperative complication rates and long-term functional outcome. They identified all patients undergoing free-tissue transfer with significant peripheral vascular disease and otherwise unreconstructible soft-tissue defects. Charts were reviewed for perioperative and long-term outcome. Parameters studied included perioperative morbidity and mortality flap success, bypass graft patency, ambulatory results, and long-term limb and patient survival. Survival data were analyzed using life-table analysis, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Cox testing. A total of 79 flaps were examined in 75 patients with peripheral vascular disease from July of 1990 to November of 1999. All patients would have required a major amputation had free-tissue transfer not been performed. Mean age was 60 years, average hospital stay was 32 days, and perioperative mortality was 5 percent. Within the first 30 days after operation, there were four cases of primary flap loss, and another two were lost as the result of bypass graft failure (8 percent); five of these cases resulted in amputation. There were no primary flap failures after 30 days. Follow-up ranged to 91 months (mean, 24 months). During this time, another 14 limbs were lost, most commonly because of progressive gangrene and/or infection in sites remote from the still-viable free flap. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, 5-year flap survival was 77 percent, limb salvage 63 percent, and patient survival 67 percent. Sixty-six percent of patients were able to ambulate independently with the use of their reconstructed limb at least 1 year after hospital discharge, although some of these later went on to amputation. Free-tissue transfer for lower extremity reconstruction can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Flap loss is low, and limb salvage, ambulation, and long-term survival rates in these patients are excellent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)999-1006
Number of pages8
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume109
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Patient Transfer
Peripheral Vascular Diseases
antineoplaston A10
Limb Salvage
Extremities
Amputation
Survival
Free Tissue Flaps
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Survival Analysis
Mortality
Lower Extremity
Morbidity
Transplants
Life Tables
Gangrene
Walking
Length of Stay
Survival Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Free-tissue transfer in patients with peripheral vascular disease : A 10-year experience. / Moran, Steven Lawrence; Illig, Karl A.; Green, Richard M.; Serletti, Joseph M.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 109, No. 3, 2002, p. 999-1006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moran, Steven Lawrence ; Illig, Karl A. ; Green, Richard M. ; Serletti, Joseph M. / Free-tissue transfer in patients with peripheral vascular disease : A 10-year experience. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2002 ; Vol. 109, No. 3. pp. 999-1006.
@article{c2926930575b4d91bc893a61c1091d4b,
title = "Free-tissue transfer in patients with peripheral vascular disease: A 10-year experience",
abstract = "Advances in free-tissue transfer have allowed for lower limb salvage in patients with significant peripheral vascular disease and limb-threatening soft-tissue wounds. The authors retrospectively reviewed their 10-year experience with free flaps for limb salvage in patients with peripheral vascular disease to assess postoperative complication rates and long-term functional outcome. They identified all patients undergoing free-tissue transfer with significant peripheral vascular disease and otherwise unreconstructible soft-tissue defects. Charts were reviewed for perioperative and long-term outcome. Parameters studied included perioperative morbidity and mortality flap success, bypass graft patency, ambulatory results, and long-term limb and patient survival. Survival data were analyzed using life-table analysis, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Cox testing. A total of 79 flaps were examined in 75 patients with peripheral vascular disease from July of 1990 to November of 1999. All patients would have required a major amputation had free-tissue transfer not been performed. Mean age was 60 years, average hospital stay was 32 days, and perioperative mortality was 5 percent. Within the first 30 days after operation, there were four cases of primary flap loss, and another two were lost as the result of bypass graft failure (8 percent); five of these cases resulted in amputation. There were no primary flap failures after 30 days. Follow-up ranged to 91 months (mean, 24 months). During this time, another 14 limbs were lost, most commonly because of progressive gangrene and/or infection in sites remote from the still-viable free flap. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, 5-year flap survival was 77 percent, limb salvage 63 percent, and patient survival 67 percent. Sixty-six percent of patients were able to ambulate independently with the use of their reconstructed limb at least 1 year after hospital discharge, although some of these later went on to amputation. Free-tissue transfer for lower extremity reconstruction can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Flap loss is low, and limb salvage, ambulation, and long-term survival rates in these patients are excellent.",
author = "Moran, {Steven Lawrence} and Illig, {Karl A.} and Green, {Richard M.} and Serletti, {Joseph M.}",
year = "2002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "109",
pages = "999--1006",
journal = "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery",
issn = "0032-1052",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Free-tissue transfer in patients with peripheral vascular disease

T2 - A 10-year experience

AU - Moran, Steven Lawrence

AU - Illig, Karl A.

AU - Green, Richard M.

AU - Serletti, Joseph M.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Advances in free-tissue transfer have allowed for lower limb salvage in patients with significant peripheral vascular disease and limb-threatening soft-tissue wounds. The authors retrospectively reviewed their 10-year experience with free flaps for limb salvage in patients with peripheral vascular disease to assess postoperative complication rates and long-term functional outcome. They identified all patients undergoing free-tissue transfer with significant peripheral vascular disease and otherwise unreconstructible soft-tissue defects. Charts were reviewed for perioperative and long-term outcome. Parameters studied included perioperative morbidity and mortality flap success, bypass graft patency, ambulatory results, and long-term limb and patient survival. Survival data were analyzed using life-table analysis, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Cox testing. A total of 79 flaps were examined in 75 patients with peripheral vascular disease from July of 1990 to November of 1999. All patients would have required a major amputation had free-tissue transfer not been performed. Mean age was 60 years, average hospital stay was 32 days, and perioperative mortality was 5 percent. Within the first 30 days after operation, there were four cases of primary flap loss, and another two were lost as the result of bypass graft failure (8 percent); five of these cases resulted in amputation. There were no primary flap failures after 30 days. Follow-up ranged to 91 months (mean, 24 months). During this time, another 14 limbs were lost, most commonly because of progressive gangrene and/or infection in sites remote from the still-viable free flap. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, 5-year flap survival was 77 percent, limb salvage 63 percent, and patient survival 67 percent. Sixty-six percent of patients were able to ambulate independently with the use of their reconstructed limb at least 1 year after hospital discharge, although some of these later went on to amputation. Free-tissue transfer for lower extremity reconstruction can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Flap loss is low, and limb salvage, ambulation, and long-term survival rates in these patients are excellent.

AB - Advances in free-tissue transfer have allowed for lower limb salvage in patients with significant peripheral vascular disease and limb-threatening soft-tissue wounds. The authors retrospectively reviewed their 10-year experience with free flaps for limb salvage in patients with peripheral vascular disease to assess postoperative complication rates and long-term functional outcome. They identified all patients undergoing free-tissue transfer with significant peripheral vascular disease and otherwise unreconstructible soft-tissue defects. Charts were reviewed for perioperative and long-term outcome. Parameters studied included perioperative morbidity and mortality flap success, bypass graft patency, ambulatory results, and long-term limb and patient survival. Survival data were analyzed using life-table analysis, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Cox testing. A total of 79 flaps were examined in 75 patients with peripheral vascular disease from July of 1990 to November of 1999. All patients would have required a major amputation had free-tissue transfer not been performed. Mean age was 60 years, average hospital stay was 32 days, and perioperative mortality was 5 percent. Within the first 30 days after operation, there were four cases of primary flap loss, and another two were lost as the result of bypass graft failure (8 percent); five of these cases resulted in amputation. There were no primary flap failures after 30 days. Follow-up ranged to 91 months (mean, 24 months). During this time, another 14 limbs were lost, most commonly because of progressive gangrene and/or infection in sites remote from the still-viable free flap. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, 5-year flap survival was 77 percent, limb salvage 63 percent, and patient survival 67 percent. Sixty-six percent of patients were able to ambulate independently with the use of their reconstructed limb at least 1 year after hospital discharge, although some of these later went on to amputation. Free-tissue transfer for lower extremity reconstruction can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Flap loss is low, and limb salvage, ambulation, and long-term survival rates in these patients are excellent.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036192625&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036192625&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11884824

AN - SCOPUS:0036192625

VL - 109

SP - 999

EP - 1006

JO - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

JF - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

SN - 0032-1052

IS - 3

ER -