Fourth cranial nerve palsy and brown syndrome: Two interrelated congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders? Topical collection on neuro-ophthalmology

Pierre François Kaeser, Michael C. Brodsky

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Based on neuroimaging data showing absence of the trochlear nerve, congenital superior oblique palsy is now classified as a congenital cranial dysinnervation disorder. A similar absence of the abducens nerve is accompanied by misinnervation to the lateral rectus muscle from a branch of oculomotor nerve in the Duane retraction syndrome. This similarity raises the question of whether some cases of Brown syndrome could arise from a similar synkinesis between the inferior and superior oblique muscles in the setting of congenital superior oblique palsy. This hypothesis has gained support from the confluence of evidence from a number of independent studies. Using Duane syndrome as a model, we critically review the accumulating evidence that some cases of Brown syndrome are ultimately attributable to dysgenesis of the trochlear nerve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number352
JournalCurrent neurology and neuroscience reports
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2013

Keywords

  • Abducens nerve
  • Brown syndrome
  • CCDD
  • Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorder
  • Duane syndrome
  • Fourth nerve
  • Fourth nerve palsy
  • Misinnervation
  • Oculomotor nerve
  • Sixth nerve
  • Superior oblique palsy
  • Synkinesis
  • Third nerve
  • Trochlear nerve
  • Trochlear palsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

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