Fluorescein and radiolabeled Function-Spacer-Lipid constructs allow for simple in vitro and in vivo bioimaging of enveloped virions

Elizabeth M. Hadac, Mark J. Federspiel, Evgeny Chernyy, Alexander Tuzikov, Elena Korchagina, Nicolai V. Bovin, Stephen Russell, Stephen M. Henry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Tools that can aid in vitro and in vivo imaging and also noninvasively determine half-life and biodistribution are required to advance clinical developments. A Function-Spacer-Lipid construct (FSL) incorporating fluorescein (FSL-FLRO4) was used to label vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), measles virus MV-NIS (MV) and influenza virus (H1N1). The ability of FSL constructs to label these virions was established directly by FACScan of FSL-FLRO4 labeled VSV and MV, and indirectly following labeled H1N1 and MV binding to a cells. FSL-FLRO4 labeling of H1N1 was shown to maintain higher infectivity of the virus when compared with direct fluorescein virus labeling. A novel tyrosine 125I radioiodinated FSL construct was synthesized (FSL- 125I) from FSL-tyrosine. This was used to label VSV (VSV-FSL- 125I), which was infused into the peritoneal cavity of laboratory mice. Bioscanning showed VSV-FSL- 125I to localize in the liver, spleen and bloodstream in contrast to the free labels FSL- 125I or 125I, which localized predominantly in the liver and thyroid respectively. This is a proof-of-principle novel and rapid method for modifying virions and demonstrates the potential of FSL constructs to improve in vivo imaging of virions and noninvasively observe in vivo biodistribution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-84
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Virological Methods
Volume176
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

Keywords

  • Kodecyte
  • Kodevirion
  • Labeling
  • Virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

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