Flow velocity vector fields by ultrasound particle imaging velocimetry: In vitro comparison with optical flow velocimetry

John Westerdale, Marek Belohlavek, Eileen M. McMahon, Panupong Jiamsripong, Jeffrey J. Heys, Michele Milano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives-We performed an in vitro study to assess the precision and accuracy of particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) data acquired using a clinically available portable ultrasound system via comparison with stereo optical PIV. Methods-The performance of ultrasound PIV was compared with optical PIV on a benchmark problem involving vortical flow with a substantial out-of-plane velocity component. Optical PIV is capable of stereo image acquisition, thus measuring out-of-plane velocity components. This allowed us to quantify the accuracy of ultrasound PIV, which is limited to in-plane acquisition. The system performance was assessed by considering the instantaneous velocity fields without extracting velocity profiles by spatial averaging. Results-Within the 2-dimensional correlation window, using 7 time-averaged frames, the vector fields were found to have correlations of 0.867 in the direction along the ultrasound beam and 0.738 in the perpendicular direction. Out-of-plane motion of greater than 20% of the in-plane vector magnitude was found to increase the SD by 11% for the vectors parallel to the ultrasound beam direction and 8.6% for the vectors perpendicular to the beam. Conclusions-The results show a close correlation and agreement of individual velocity vectors generated by ultrasound PIV compared with optical PIV. Most of the measurement distortions were caused by out-of-plane velocity components.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-195
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Ultrasound in Medicine
Volume30
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

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Rheology
Ultrasonography
Optical Imaging
Benchmarking
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Echocardiographic particle imaging velocimetry
  • Optical particle imaging velocimetry
  • Ultrasound particle imaging velocimetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Flow velocity vector fields by ultrasound particle imaging velocimetry : In vitro comparison with optical flow velocimetry. / Westerdale, John; Belohlavek, Marek; McMahon, Eileen M.; Jiamsripong, Panupong; Heys, Jeffrey J.; Milano, Michele.

In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 187-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Westerdale, John ; Belohlavek, Marek ; McMahon, Eileen M. ; Jiamsripong, Panupong ; Heys, Jeffrey J. ; Milano, Michele. / Flow velocity vector fields by ultrasound particle imaging velocimetry : In vitro comparison with optical flow velocimetry. In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 187-195.
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