Flow velocity vector fields by ultrasound particle imaging velocimetry

In vitro comparison with optical flow velocimetry

John Westerdale, Marek Belohlavek, Eileen M. McMahon, Panupong Jiamsripong, Jeffrey J. Heys, Michele Milano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives-We performed an in vitro study to assess the precision and accuracy of particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) data acquired using a clinically available portable ultrasound system via comparison with stereo optical PIV. Methods-The performance of ultrasound PIV was compared with optical PIV on a benchmark problem involving vortical flow with a substantial out-of-plane velocity component. Optical PIV is capable of stereo image acquisition, thus measuring out-of-plane velocity components. This allowed us to quantify the accuracy of ultrasound PIV, which is limited to in-plane acquisition. The system performance was assessed by considering the instantaneous velocity fields without extracting velocity profiles by spatial averaging. Results-Within the 2-dimensional correlation window, using 7 time-averaged frames, the vector fields were found to have correlations of 0.867 in the direction along the ultrasound beam and 0.738 in the perpendicular direction. Out-of-plane motion of greater than 20% of the in-plane vector magnitude was found to increase the SD by 11% for the vectors parallel to the ultrasound beam direction and 8.6% for the vectors perpendicular to the beam. Conclusions-The results show a close correlation and agreement of individual velocity vectors generated by ultrasound PIV compared with optical PIV. Most of the measurement distortions were caused by out-of-plane velocity components.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-195
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Ultrasound in Medicine
Volume30
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

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Rheology
Ultrasonography
Optical Imaging
Benchmarking
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Echocardiographic particle imaging velocimetry
  • Optical particle imaging velocimetry
  • Ultrasound particle imaging velocimetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Flow velocity vector fields by ultrasound particle imaging velocimetry : In vitro comparison with optical flow velocimetry. / Westerdale, John; Belohlavek, Marek; McMahon, Eileen M.; Jiamsripong, Panupong; Heys, Jeffrey J.; Milano, Michele.

In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 187-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Westerdale, John ; Belohlavek, Marek ; McMahon, Eileen M. ; Jiamsripong, Panupong ; Heys, Jeffrey J. ; Milano, Michele. / Flow velocity vector fields by ultrasound particle imaging velocimetry : In vitro comparison with optical flow velocimetry. In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 187-195.
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