Flow disruptions in trauma surgery: Type, impact, and affect

Renaldo Blocker, Sacha Duff, Douglas Wiegmann, Ken Catchpole, Jennifer Blaha, Daniel Shouhed, Eric Ley, Cathy Karl, Richard Karl, Bruce Gewertz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to identify and understand all components of the trauma care process to mitigate the systemic challenges faced by clinicians attempting to deliver the best trauma care. The study was conducted using a prospective data collection method. An interdisciplinary team of researchers observed 87 cases over a 10-week period and identified 1759 flow disruptions. There were a higher number of flow disruptions per case in the operating room (M=61.3, ±36.72) than in the emergency department (M=9.2, ±1.77) or radiology (M=7.5, ±2.01). Focusing on the OR, the majority of the flow disruptions identified in the OR were due to either coordination issues (28%) or communication breakdowns (24%). Roughly 12% of disruptions resulted in moderate delays or full case cessation. This study demonstrates the value of using flow disruptions as a surrogate for efficiency and quality outcome measures, and as a diagnostic method for understanding higher order problems in the system of trauma care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Pages811-815
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2012Oct 26 2012

Other

OtherProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/22/1210/26/12

Fingerprint

Operating rooms
Radiology
Surgery
surgery
trauma
Communication
data collection method
diagnostic
efficiency
communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Blocker, R., Duff, S., Wiegmann, D., Catchpole, K., Blaha, J., Shouhed, D., ... Gewertz, B. (2012). Flow disruptions in trauma surgery: Type, impact, and affect. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 (pp. 811-815) https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561169

Flow disruptions in trauma surgery : Type, impact, and affect. / Blocker, Renaldo; Duff, Sacha; Wiegmann, Douglas; Catchpole, Ken; Blaha, Jennifer; Shouhed, Daniel; Ley, Eric; Karl, Cathy; Karl, Richard; Gewertz, Bruce.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. p. 811-815.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Blocker, R, Duff, S, Wiegmann, D, Catchpole, K, Blaha, J, Shouhed, D, Ley, E, Karl, C, Karl, R & Gewertz, B 2012, Flow disruptions in trauma surgery: Type, impact, and affect. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. pp. 811-815, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012, Boston, MA, United States, 10/22/12. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561169
Blocker R, Duff S, Wiegmann D, Catchpole K, Blaha J, Shouhed D et al. Flow disruptions in trauma surgery: Type, impact, and affect. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. p. 811-815 https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561169
Blocker, Renaldo ; Duff, Sacha ; Wiegmann, Douglas ; Catchpole, Ken ; Blaha, Jennifer ; Shouhed, Daniel ; Ley, Eric ; Karl, Cathy ; Karl, Richard ; Gewertz, Bruce. / Flow disruptions in trauma surgery : Type, impact, and affect. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. pp. 811-815
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