Fibrovascular polyp

John Barlow

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Imaging description Fibrovascular polyps are intraluminal masses that demonstrate mixed attenuation by CT. These pedunculated masses are usually smooth and sausage-shaped (Figure 35.1). They typically arise from the cervical esophagus. They extend inferiorly into the thoracic esophagus and can measure up to 25 cm in length. The diameter of a fibrovascular polyp is usually much greater than the diameter of the esophagus; consequently, these polyps distend the esophagus. Sometimes a longitudinal artery is demonstrated in the center of the polyp by CT with intravenous contrast material [1]. Esophagram confirms an intraluminal mass (Figure 35.2). Importance Fibrovascular polyps are rare, benign masses consisting of variable amounts of fibrous, vascular, and adipose tissue covered by normal squamous epithelium [2]. Imaging identification of fibrovascular polyps is important since up to 25% of these polyps are missed at endoscopy because they are covered with normal squamous epithelium [3]. Excision of fibrovascular polyps solves two significant problems: (1) progressive dysphagia and (2) the risk of airway obstruction and asphyxiation caused by regurgitation of the polyp into the pharynx [4]. Fibrovascular polyps do not undergo malignant degeneration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages88-89
Number of pages2
ISBN (Print)9780511977701, 9780521119078
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Polyps
Esophagus
Epithelium
Asphyxia
Airway Obstruction
Deglutition Disorders
Pharynx
Contrast Media
Endoscopy
Blood Vessels
Adipose Tissue
Thorax
Arteries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Barlow, J. (2011). Fibrovascular polyp. In Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses (pp. 88-89). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511977701.036

Fibrovascular polyp. / Barlow, John.

Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press, 2011. p. 88-89.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Barlow, J 2011, Fibrovascular polyp. in Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press, pp. 88-89. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511977701.036
Barlow J. Fibrovascular polyp. In Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press. 2011. p. 88-89 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511977701.036
Barlow, John. / Fibrovascular polyp. Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press, 2011. pp. 88-89
@inbook{b0070cced3f74f37929d65a6df00c12c,
title = "Fibrovascular polyp",
abstract = "Imaging description Fibrovascular polyps are intraluminal masses that demonstrate mixed attenuation by CT. These pedunculated masses are usually smooth and sausage-shaped (Figure 35.1). They typically arise from the cervical esophagus. They extend inferiorly into the thoracic esophagus and can measure up to 25 cm in length. The diameter of a fibrovascular polyp is usually much greater than the diameter of the esophagus; consequently, these polyps distend the esophagus. Sometimes a longitudinal artery is demonstrated in the center of the polyp by CT with intravenous contrast material [1]. Esophagram confirms an intraluminal mass (Figure 35.2). Importance Fibrovascular polyps are rare, benign masses consisting of variable amounts of fibrous, vascular, and adipose tissue covered by normal squamous epithelium [2]. Imaging identification of fibrovascular polyps is important since up to 25{\%} of these polyps are missed at endoscopy because they are covered with normal squamous epithelium [3]. Excision of fibrovascular polyps solves two significant problems: (1) progressive dysphagia and (2) the risk of airway obstruction and asphyxiation caused by regurgitation of the polyp into the pharynx [4]. Fibrovascular polyps do not undergo malignant degeneration.",
author = "John Barlow",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/CBO9780511977701.036",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780511977701",
pages = "88--89",
booktitle = "Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Fibrovascular polyp

AU - Barlow, John

PY - 2011/1/1

Y1 - 2011/1/1

N2 - Imaging description Fibrovascular polyps are intraluminal masses that demonstrate mixed attenuation by CT. These pedunculated masses are usually smooth and sausage-shaped (Figure 35.1). They typically arise from the cervical esophagus. They extend inferiorly into the thoracic esophagus and can measure up to 25 cm in length. The diameter of a fibrovascular polyp is usually much greater than the diameter of the esophagus; consequently, these polyps distend the esophagus. Sometimes a longitudinal artery is demonstrated in the center of the polyp by CT with intravenous contrast material [1]. Esophagram confirms an intraluminal mass (Figure 35.2). Importance Fibrovascular polyps are rare, benign masses consisting of variable amounts of fibrous, vascular, and adipose tissue covered by normal squamous epithelium [2]. Imaging identification of fibrovascular polyps is important since up to 25% of these polyps are missed at endoscopy because they are covered with normal squamous epithelium [3]. Excision of fibrovascular polyps solves two significant problems: (1) progressive dysphagia and (2) the risk of airway obstruction and asphyxiation caused by regurgitation of the polyp into the pharynx [4]. Fibrovascular polyps do not undergo malignant degeneration.

AB - Imaging description Fibrovascular polyps are intraluminal masses that demonstrate mixed attenuation by CT. These pedunculated masses are usually smooth and sausage-shaped (Figure 35.1). They typically arise from the cervical esophagus. They extend inferiorly into the thoracic esophagus and can measure up to 25 cm in length. The diameter of a fibrovascular polyp is usually much greater than the diameter of the esophagus; consequently, these polyps distend the esophagus. Sometimes a longitudinal artery is demonstrated in the center of the polyp by CT with intravenous contrast material [1]. Esophagram confirms an intraluminal mass (Figure 35.2). Importance Fibrovascular polyps are rare, benign masses consisting of variable amounts of fibrous, vascular, and adipose tissue covered by normal squamous epithelium [2]. Imaging identification of fibrovascular polyps is important since up to 25% of these polyps are missed at endoscopy because they are covered with normal squamous epithelium [3]. Excision of fibrovascular polyps solves two significant problems: (1) progressive dysphagia and (2) the risk of airway obstruction and asphyxiation caused by regurgitation of the polyp into the pharynx [4]. Fibrovascular polyps do not undergo malignant degeneration.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84923618847&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84923618847&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/CBO9780511977701.036

DO - 10.1017/CBO9780511977701.036

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780511977701

SN - 9780521119078

SP - 88

EP - 89

BT - Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses

PB - Cambridge University Press

ER -