Feasibility of tobacco interventions in anesthesiology practices

A pilot study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Abstinence from smoking can improve postoperative outcomes, and surgery is also an excellent opportunity for smokers to permanently quit. One strategy for perioperative tobacco interventions is that anesthesiologists Ask, Advise, and Refer (AAR)-Ask their patients about tobacco use, Advise them to abstain, and Refer them to resources such as telephone quitlines. This pilot project determined the feasibility and acceptability of the AAR strategy in anesthesiology practices. Methods: An educational program, including presentations, written materials, and Web-based resources, was developed and disseminated to 14 U.S. anesthesiology practices, representing both academic and private practices, who agreed to implement the AAR strategy as a part of their routine clinical practice. Three months after implementation, a survey was administered to those members of these practices who were instructed in the AAR strategy. RESULTS: There were 97 respondents (75% response rate). Since the pilot project began, 91%, 79%, and 58% of respondents reported that they frequently or almost always asked, advised, and referred their patients who smoke, respectively. The majority of respondents (56%) agreed that they were responsible for helping patients get the help they need to quit smoking. Most (74%) also agreed that they planned to incorporate the AAR strategy into their routine practice. Conclusion: These results suggest that the AAR strategy is potentially feasible and well-accepted in anesthesiology clinical practice. Further work will be needed to define whether these practices and attitudes can be sustained and whether they are ultimately effective in modifying perioperative smoking behavior in surgical patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1223-1228
Number of pages6
JournalAnesthesiology
Volume110
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

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Anesthesiology
Tobacco
Smoking
Private Practice
Tobacco Use
Telephone
Smoke
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Feasibility of tobacco interventions in anesthesiology practices : A pilot study. / Warner, David Oman.

In: Anesthesiology, Vol. 110, No. 6, 06.2009, p. 1223-1228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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