Feasibility of a pressure wire and single arterial puncture for assessing aortic valve area in patients with aortic stenosis

Jang Ho Bae, Amir Lerman, Eric Yang, Charanjit Rihal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Determination of a transvalvular pressure gradient for measurement of aortic valve area (AVA) by hemodynamic cardiac catheterization usually requires 2 catheters and 2 arterial access sites. We assessed the feasibility of using a single arterial puncture and a 0.014 inch pressure wire for evaluation of aortic stenosis. METHODS: Eighteen patients (mean age, 76 years; 10 men) underwent hemodynamic catheterization for assessment of AVA. Cardiac output was determined by thermodilution (using a pulmonary artery catheter), and the transvalvular pressure gradient was obtained from simultaneous pressure recordings (using a pressure wire to measure left ventricular pressure and a 5 Fr catheter to measure ascending aortic pressure). RESULTS: This novel technique was technically feasible in all patients. Calibration of the pressure wire with the pressure of the fluid-filled catheter was possible and accurate in the left ventricle and aorta. The method required 36.4 ± 9.6 minutes from injection of a local anesthetic to completion of AVA measurement; 53.3 ± 18.6 minutes were required to finish all catheterization procedures, including coronary angiography. Measurements of AVA (mean, 1.01 ± 0.43 cm2) and pressure gradients (mean, 27.5 ± 10.5 mmHg) taken by a pressure wire were similar to measurements taken by Doppler echocardiography (1.07 ± 0.58 cm2 and 32.9 ± 12.1 mmHg, respectively); the correlation was significant (r = 0.856; p < 0.001, and r = 0.741; p < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a single arterial approach using a pressure wire is feasible, safe, accurate and rapid for the invasive assessment of aortic stenosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-362
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Invasive Cardiology
Volume18
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 2006

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Aortic Valve Stenosis
Aortic Valve
Punctures
Pressure
Catheters
Catheterization
Hemodynamics
Thermodilution
Doppler Echocardiography
Ventricular Pressure
Cardiac Catheterization
Local Anesthetics
Coronary Angiography
Cardiac Output
Pulmonary Artery
Calibration
Heart Ventricles
Aorta
Arterial Pressure
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Feasibility of a pressure wire and single arterial puncture for assessing aortic valve area in patients with aortic stenosis. / Bae, Jang Ho; Lerman, Amir; Yang, Eric; Rihal, Charanjit.

In: Journal of Invasive Cardiology, Vol. 18, No. 8, 08.2006, p. 359-362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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