Feasibility and Procedural Safety of alfapump System Implantation by IR: Experience from the MOSAIC Study, a Multicenter, Open-Label Prospective Study in Cirrhotic Patients with Refractory Ascites

Emily C. Bendel, Kenneth Sniderman, Cathryn Shaw, R. Todd Frederick, Florence Wong, Arun Sanyal, Sumeet K. Asrani, Patrick S. Kamath, Jeroen Capel, Ziv J. Haskal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate feasibility, procedural outcomes, and safety aspects of implantation of the alfapump system for management of refractory ascites by interventional radiology (IR) methods. Materials and Methods: The multicenter open-label prospective MOSAIC study included 29 patients (mean age 60.0 y ± 9.9; range, 32–72 y, 17 [56.7%] male) with cirrhotic refractory ascites who received an alfapump system implanted by IR. The fully subcutaneous alfapump system consists of a pump and 2 silicone catheters, whose distal ends are inserted in the peritoneum and the bladder, respectively. The device moves ascites from the peritoneum to the bladder, reducing the requirement of paracentesis. Pumped volume and speed can be customized as required. The implant procedure was performed under general or local anesthesia. Both catheters were placed under ultrasound guidance. The pump was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket on the upper abdomen. Incidence and severity of procedure-related serious adverse events up to 3 months after implantation were recorded. Results: Technical success was achieved in 29 (100%) IR implant procedures. The pump was usually implanted on the right abdomen (76.7%). In 5 patients, deviation from the Instructions for Use was required. Adverse events (requirement of additional incisions, postoperative bleed) occurred in 3 patients. At 3 months after implantation, 3 possibly procedure-related serious adverse events (ascites leakage, bacterial peritonitis, postoperative bleeding) had occurred. Two explantations (2/29; 6.8%) (cellulitis, pump pocket infection) and 4 reinterventions (pump or catheter replacement) were required, corresponding to an adverse event incidence rate of 9/29 (31.0%). Conclusions: Placement of the alfapump using IR methods is both feasible and technically successful.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1256-1262.e3
JournalJournal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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