Favorable glycemic response of type 2 diabetics to low-calorie cranberry juice

T. Wilson, S. L. Meyers, A. P. Singh, Paul John Limburg, N. Vorsa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fruit and vegetable intake is typically low for type 2 diabetics, possibly due to a perceived adverse effect on glycemic control. Cranberry juice (CBJ) may represent an attractive means for increasing fruit intake and simultaneously affording positive health benefits. This single cross-over design compared metabolic responses of type 2 diabetics (n = 12) to unsweetened low-calorie CBJ (LCCBJ; 19 Cal/240 mL), carbohydrate sweetened normal calorie CBJ (NCCBJ; 120 Cal/240 mL), isocaloric low-calorie sugar water control (LCC), and isocaloric normal calorie sugar water control (NCC) interventions. CBJ flavonols and anthocyanins, and proanthocyanidins were quantified with HPLC, LC-MS, and MALDI-TOF that includes an original characterization of several large oligomeric proanthocyanidins. Blood glucose peaked 30 min postingestion after NCCBJ and NCC at 13.3 ± 0.5 and 12.8 ± 0.9 (mmol/L), and these responses were significantly greater than the LCCBJ and LCC peaks of 8.1 ± 0.5 and 8.7 ± 0.5, respectively. Differences in glycemic response remained significant 60 min, but not 120 min postingestion. Plasma insulin values 60 min postingestion for NCCBJ and NCC interventions were 140 ± 19 and 151 ± 18 (pmol/L), respectively, and significantly greater than the LCCBJ and LCC values of 56 ± 10 and 54 ± 10; differences were not significant 120 min postingestion. Metabolic responses within the 2 high and 2 low-calorie beverages were virtually identical; however, exposure to potentially beneficial nutrients was greater with CBJ. Relative to conventionally sweetened preparation, LCCBJ provides a favorable metabolic response and should be useful for promoting increased fruit consumption among type 2 diabetics or others wishing to limit carbohydrate intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Food Science
Volume73
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008

Fingerprint

Vaccinium macrocarpon
cranberries
juices
fruit consumption
Proanthocyanidins
Fruit
proanthocyanidins
Carbohydrates
sugars
Flavonols
glycemic control
carbohydrate intake
Anthocyanins
Water
Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry
Beverages
vegetable consumption
Insurance Benefits
flavonols
Vegetables

Keywords

  • Cranberry
  • Diabetic
  • Flavonol
  • Glycemic
  • Proanthocyanidin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Favorable glycemic response of type 2 diabetics to low-calorie cranberry juice. / Wilson, T.; Meyers, S. L.; Singh, A. P.; Limburg, Paul John; Vorsa, N.

In: Journal of Food Science, Vol. 73, No. 9, 11.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, T. ; Meyers, S. L. ; Singh, A. P. ; Limburg, Paul John ; Vorsa, N. / Favorable glycemic response of type 2 diabetics to low-calorie cranberry juice. In: Journal of Food Science. 2008 ; Vol. 73, No. 9.
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