Fast spoiled gradient-recalled MR imaging of thoracic aortic dissection

Preliminary clinical experience at 1.5 T

Ronald M. Summers, H. Dirk Sostman, Charles E. Spritzer, Jeff L. Fidler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate fast spoiled gradient-recalled (FSPGR) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic dissection (TAD). Twenty-eight patients with suspected TAD underwent MR imaging with FSPGR and either cine or cardiac-gated spin-echo MR techniques. The average scanning lime for the FSPGR images was approximately 1 min. Three readers interpreted the FSPGR images for the presence or absence of TAD. An ROC analysis was done. At a specificity of 90%, the sensitivity ranged from 52% to 90% for the three readers. Pulsatility artifacts and mural thrombus were causes of false-positive and false-negative readings. The areas under the ROC curves (A(z)) ranged from 0.85 to 0.97 for the three readers. There was a statistically significant difference in the A(z) values for two of the experienced readers (p = .02). The correct type of dissection was determined in only 65% of the true-positive diagnoses. FSPGR has a very limited role in screening and for rapid evaluation of the unstable patient. The results are reader dependent and susceptible to pulsatility artifacts. Determination of the type of dissection is limited. With a suspected thoracic aortic dissection, therefore, additional imaging sequences should he obtained to maximize accuracy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalMagnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dissection
dissection
Magnetic resonance
magnetic resonance
readers
Thorax
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Imaging techniques
gradients
ROC Curve
Artifacts
artifacts
calcium oxides
Lime
Area Under Curve
Reading
echoes
Screening
Thrombosis
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Aorta, dissection
  • MR, rapid imaging
  • MR, vascular studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Structural Biology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Fast spoiled gradient-recalled MR imaging of thoracic aortic dissection : Preliminary clinical experience at 1.5 T. / Summers, Ronald M.; Sostman, H. Dirk; Spritzer, Charles E.; Fidler, Jeff L.

In: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Vol. 14, No. 1, 1996, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Summers, Ronald M. ; Sostman, H. Dirk ; Spritzer, Charles E. ; Fidler, Jeff L. / Fast spoiled gradient-recalled MR imaging of thoracic aortic dissection : Preliminary clinical experience at 1.5 T. In: Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 1996 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 1-9.
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