Familial Risk of Biliary Tract Cancers: A Population-Based Study in Utah

Niloy Jewel Samadder, Ken Robert Smith, Jathine Wong, Heidi Hanson, Kenneth Boucher, Randall W. Burt, Michael Charlton, Kathryn R. Byrne, Juan F. Gallegos-Orozco, Cathryn Koptiuch, Karen Curtin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Biliary tract cancers (BTC) including, cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and gallbladder cancer (GBC), are rare and highly fatal malignancies. The etiology and inherited susceptibility of both malignancies are poorly understood. We quantified the risk of BTC in first-degree (FDR), second-degree (SDR), and first cousin (FC) relatives of individuals with BTC, stratified by tumor subsite. Methods: BTC diagnosed between 1980 and 2011 were identified from the Utah Cancer Registry and linked to pedigrees from the Utah Population Database. Age- and gender-matched BTC-free controls were selected to form the comparison group for determining BTC risk in relatives using Cox regression analysis. Results: Of the 1302 index patients diagnosed with BTC, 550 (42.2 %) were located in the gallbladder and 752 (57.8 %) were cholangiocarcinomas. There was no elevated risk of BTC (all subsites combined) in FDRs (HR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.29–3.0), SDRs (HR 0.25, 95 % CI 0.06–1.03), and FCs (HR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.61–1.51) of BTC cases compared to cancer-free controls. Similarly, no increased familial risk of GBC or CC was found in relatives of BTC patients stratified by tumor subsite compared to relatives of controls. Conclusions: Relatives of BTC patients are not at an increased risk of GBC or CC in a statewide population. This suggests that biliary tract cancer risk is not associated with a familial predisposition and may be mitigated more strongly by environmental modifiers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3627-3632
Number of pages6
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume61
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biliary Tract Neoplasms
Population
Cholangiocarcinoma
Gallbladder Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Pedigree
Gallbladder
Registries

Keywords

  • Biliary tract
  • Cholangiocarcinoma
  • Familial
  • Gallbladder cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Samadder, N. J., Smith, K. R., Wong, J., Hanson, H., Boucher, K., Burt, R. W., ... Curtin, K. (2016). Familial Risk of Biliary Tract Cancers: A Population-Based Study in Utah. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 61(12), 3627-3632. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-016-4310-3

Familial Risk of Biliary Tract Cancers : A Population-Based Study in Utah. / Samadder, Niloy Jewel; Smith, Ken Robert; Wong, Jathine; Hanson, Heidi; Boucher, Kenneth; Burt, Randall W.; Charlton, Michael; Byrne, Kathryn R.; Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F.; Koptiuch, Cathryn; Curtin, Karen.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 61, No. 12, 01.12.2016, p. 3627-3632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Samadder, NJ, Smith, KR, Wong, J, Hanson, H, Boucher, K, Burt, RW, Charlton, M, Byrne, KR, Gallegos-Orozco, JF, Koptiuch, C & Curtin, K 2016, 'Familial Risk of Biliary Tract Cancers: A Population-Based Study in Utah', Digestive Diseases and Sciences, vol. 61, no. 12, pp. 3627-3632. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-016-4310-3
Samadder, Niloy Jewel ; Smith, Ken Robert ; Wong, Jathine ; Hanson, Heidi ; Boucher, Kenneth ; Burt, Randall W. ; Charlton, Michael ; Byrne, Kathryn R. ; Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F. ; Koptiuch, Cathryn ; Curtin, Karen. / Familial Risk of Biliary Tract Cancers : A Population-Based Study in Utah. In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 2016 ; Vol. 61, No. 12. pp. 3627-3632.
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abstract = "Background and Objectives: Biliary tract cancers (BTC) including, cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and gallbladder cancer (GBC), are rare and highly fatal malignancies. The etiology and inherited susceptibility of both malignancies are poorly understood. We quantified the risk of BTC in first-degree (FDR), second-degree (SDR), and first cousin (FC) relatives of individuals with BTC, stratified by tumor subsite. Methods: BTC diagnosed between 1980 and 2011 were identified from the Utah Cancer Registry and linked to pedigrees from the Utah Population Database. Age- and gender-matched BTC-free controls were selected to form the comparison group for determining BTC risk in relatives using Cox regression analysis. Results: Of the 1302 index patients diagnosed with BTC, 550 (42.2 {\%}) were located in the gallbladder and 752 (57.8 {\%}) were cholangiocarcinomas. There was no elevated risk of BTC (all subsites combined) in FDRs (HR 0.94, 95 {\%} CI 0.29–3.0), SDRs (HR 0.25, 95 {\%} CI 0.06–1.03), and FCs (HR 0.96, 95 {\%} CI 0.61–1.51) of BTC cases compared to cancer-free controls. Similarly, no increased familial risk of GBC or CC was found in relatives of BTC patients stratified by tumor subsite compared to relatives of controls. Conclusions: Relatives of BTC patients are not at an increased risk of GBC or CC in a statewide population. This suggests that biliary tract cancer risk is not associated with a familial predisposition and may be mitigated more strongly by environmental modifiers.",
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T2 - A Population-Based Study in Utah

AU - Samadder, Niloy Jewel

AU - Smith, Ken Robert

AU - Wong, Jathine

AU - Hanson, Heidi

AU - Boucher, Kenneth

AU - Burt, Randall W.

AU - Charlton, Michael

AU - Byrne, Kathryn R.

AU - Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F.

AU - Koptiuch, Cathryn

AU - Curtin, Karen

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - Background and Objectives: Biliary tract cancers (BTC) including, cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and gallbladder cancer (GBC), are rare and highly fatal malignancies. The etiology and inherited susceptibility of both malignancies are poorly understood. We quantified the risk of BTC in first-degree (FDR), second-degree (SDR), and first cousin (FC) relatives of individuals with BTC, stratified by tumor subsite. Methods: BTC diagnosed between 1980 and 2011 were identified from the Utah Cancer Registry and linked to pedigrees from the Utah Population Database. Age- and gender-matched BTC-free controls were selected to form the comparison group for determining BTC risk in relatives using Cox regression analysis. Results: Of the 1302 index patients diagnosed with BTC, 550 (42.2 %) were located in the gallbladder and 752 (57.8 %) were cholangiocarcinomas. There was no elevated risk of BTC (all subsites combined) in FDRs (HR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.29–3.0), SDRs (HR 0.25, 95 % CI 0.06–1.03), and FCs (HR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.61–1.51) of BTC cases compared to cancer-free controls. Similarly, no increased familial risk of GBC or CC was found in relatives of BTC patients stratified by tumor subsite compared to relatives of controls. Conclusions: Relatives of BTC patients are not at an increased risk of GBC or CC in a statewide population. This suggests that biliary tract cancer risk is not associated with a familial predisposition and may be mitigated more strongly by environmental modifiers.

AB - Background and Objectives: Biliary tract cancers (BTC) including, cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and gallbladder cancer (GBC), are rare and highly fatal malignancies. The etiology and inherited susceptibility of both malignancies are poorly understood. We quantified the risk of BTC in first-degree (FDR), second-degree (SDR), and first cousin (FC) relatives of individuals with BTC, stratified by tumor subsite. Methods: BTC diagnosed between 1980 and 2011 were identified from the Utah Cancer Registry and linked to pedigrees from the Utah Population Database. Age- and gender-matched BTC-free controls were selected to form the comparison group for determining BTC risk in relatives using Cox regression analysis. Results: Of the 1302 index patients diagnosed with BTC, 550 (42.2 %) were located in the gallbladder and 752 (57.8 %) were cholangiocarcinomas. There was no elevated risk of BTC (all subsites combined) in FDRs (HR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.29–3.0), SDRs (HR 0.25, 95 % CI 0.06–1.03), and FCs (HR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.61–1.51) of BTC cases compared to cancer-free controls. Similarly, no increased familial risk of GBC or CC was found in relatives of BTC patients stratified by tumor subsite compared to relatives of controls. Conclusions: Relatives of BTC patients are not at an increased risk of GBC or CC in a statewide population. This suggests that biliary tract cancer risk is not associated with a familial predisposition and may be mitigated more strongly by environmental modifiers.

KW - Biliary tract

KW - Cholangiocarcinoma

KW - Familial

KW - Gallbladder cancer

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