Familial colorectal cancer risk by subsite of primary cancer: A population-based study in Utah

Niloy Jewel Samadder, K. R. Smith, G. P. Mineau, R. Pimentel, J. Wong, K. Boucher, L. Pappas, H. Singh, D. Ahnen, R. W. Burt, K. Curtin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background Familial occurrence is common in colorectal cancer (CRC), but whether this increased familial risk differs by colonic subsite of the index patients CRC is not well understood. Aim To quantify the risk of CRC in first-degree (FDR), second-degree (SDR) and first cousin (FC) relatives of individuals with CRC, stratified by subsite in the colorectum and age at diagnosis. Methods Colorectal cancers diagnosed between 1980 and 2010 were identified from the Utah Cancer Registry and linked to pedigrees from the Utah Population Database. Age and gender-matched CRC-free controls were selected to form the comparison group for determining CRC risk in relatives using Cox regression analysis. Results Of the 18 208 index patients diagnosed with CRC, 6584 (36.2%) were located in the proximal colon, 5986 (32.9%) in the distal colon and 5638 (31%) in the rectum. The elevated risk of CRC in relatives was similar in analysis stratified for CRC colorectal subsites in the index cases. FDR had similarly elevated risk of all site CRC, whether the index patient had cancer in the proximal colon [hazards ratio (HR): 1.85; 95% CI: 1.70-2.02], distal colon (HR: 1.90; 95% CI: 1.73-2.08) or rectum (HR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.66-2.02) compared to relatives of controls. This risk was consistently greater for FDR when cases developed CRC below the age of 60 years. Conclusions Relatives of CRC patients have a similarly elevated risk of CRC regardless of colonic tumour subsite in the index patient, and it is greatest for relatives of younger age index cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)573-580
Number of pages8
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Colorectal Neoplasms
Population
Neoplasms
Colon
Rectum
Pedigree
Registries
Regression Analysis
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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Familial colorectal cancer risk by subsite of primary cancer : A population-based study in Utah. / Samadder, Niloy Jewel; Smith, K. R.; Mineau, G. P.; Pimentel, R.; Wong, J.; Boucher, K.; Pappas, L.; Singh, H.; Ahnen, D.; Burt, R. W.; Curtin, K.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 41, No. 6, 01.01.2015, p. 573-580.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Samadder, NJ, Smith, KR, Mineau, GP, Pimentel, R, Wong, J, Boucher, K, Pappas, L, Singh, H, Ahnen, D, Burt, RW & Curtin, K 2015, 'Familial colorectal cancer risk by subsite of primary cancer: A population-based study in Utah', Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 573-580. https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.13086
Samadder, Niloy Jewel ; Smith, K. R. ; Mineau, G. P. ; Pimentel, R. ; Wong, J. ; Boucher, K. ; Pappas, L. ; Singh, H. ; Ahnen, D. ; Burt, R. W. ; Curtin, K. / Familial colorectal cancer risk by subsite of primary cancer : A population-based study in Utah. In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2015 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 573-580.
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abstract = "Background Familial occurrence is common in colorectal cancer (CRC), but whether this increased familial risk differs by colonic subsite of the index patients CRC is not well understood. Aim To quantify the risk of CRC in first-degree (FDR), second-degree (SDR) and first cousin (FC) relatives of individuals with CRC, stratified by subsite in the colorectum and age at diagnosis. Methods Colorectal cancers diagnosed between 1980 and 2010 were identified from the Utah Cancer Registry and linked to pedigrees from the Utah Population Database. Age and gender-matched CRC-free controls were selected to form the comparison group for determining CRC risk in relatives using Cox regression analysis. Results Of the 18 208 index patients diagnosed with CRC, 6584 (36.2{\%}) were located in the proximal colon, 5986 (32.9{\%}) in the distal colon and 5638 (31{\%}) in the rectum. The elevated risk of CRC in relatives was similar in analysis stratified for CRC colorectal subsites in the index cases. FDR had similarly elevated risk of all site CRC, whether the index patient had cancer in the proximal colon [hazards ratio (HR): 1.85; 95{\%} CI: 1.70-2.02], distal colon (HR: 1.90; 95{\%} CI: 1.73-2.08) or rectum (HR: 1.83; 95{\%} CI: 1.66-2.02) compared to relatives of controls. This risk was consistently greater for FDR when cases developed CRC below the age of 60 years. Conclusions Relatives of CRC patients have a similarly elevated risk of CRC regardless of colonic tumour subsite in the index patient, and it is greatest for relatives of younger age index cases.",
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T1 - Familial colorectal cancer risk by subsite of primary cancer

T2 - A population-based study in Utah

AU - Samadder, Niloy Jewel

AU - Smith, K. R.

AU - Mineau, G. P.

AU - Pimentel, R.

AU - Wong, J.

AU - Boucher, K.

AU - Pappas, L.

AU - Singh, H.

AU - Ahnen, D.

AU - Burt, R. W.

AU - Curtin, K.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background Familial occurrence is common in colorectal cancer (CRC), but whether this increased familial risk differs by colonic subsite of the index patients CRC is not well understood. Aim To quantify the risk of CRC in first-degree (FDR), second-degree (SDR) and first cousin (FC) relatives of individuals with CRC, stratified by subsite in the colorectum and age at diagnosis. Methods Colorectal cancers diagnosed between 1980 and 2010 were identified from the Utah Cancer Registry and linked to pedigrees from the Utah Population Database. Age and gender-matched CRC-free controls were selected to form the comparison group for determining CRC risk in relatives using Cox regression analysis. Results Of the 18 208 index patients diagnosed with CRC, 6584 (36.2%) were located in the proximal colon, 5986 (32.9%) in the distal colon and 5638 (31%) in the rectum. The elevated risk of CRC in relatives was similar in analysis stratified for CRC colorectal subsites in the index cases. FDR had similarly elevated risk of all site CRC, whether the index patient had cancer in the proximal colon [hazards ratio (HR): 1.85; 95% CI: 1.70-2.02], distal colon (HR: 1.90; 95% CI: 1.73-2.08) or rectum (HR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.66-2.02) compared to relatives of controls. This risk was consistently greater for FDR when cases developed CRC below the age of 60 years. Conclusions Relatives of CRC patients have a similarly elevated risk of CRC regardless of colonic tumour subsite in the index patient, and it is greatest for relatives of younger age index cases.

AB - Background Familial occurrence is common in colorectal cancer (CRC), but whether this increased familial risk differs by colonic subsite of the index patients CRC is not well understood. Aim To quantify the risk of CRC in first-degree (FDR), second-degree (SDR) and first cousin (FC) relatives of individuals with CRC, stratified by subsite in the colorectum and age at diagnosis. Methods Colorectal cancers diagnosed between 1980 and 2010 were identified from the Utah Cancer Registry and linked to pedigrees from the Utah Population Database. Age and gender-matched CRC-free controls were selected to form the comparison group for determining CRC risk in relatives using Cox regression analysis. Results Of the 18 208 index patients diagnosed with CRC, 6584 (36.2%) were located in the proximal colon, 5986 (32.9%) in the distal colon and 5638 (31%) in the rectum. The elevated risk of CRC in relatives was similar in analysis stratified for CRC colorectal subsites in the index cases. FDR had similarly elevated risk of all site CRC, whether the index patient had cancer in the proximal colon [hazards ratio (HR): 1.85; 95% CI: 1.70-2.02], distal colon (HR: 1.90; 95% CI: 1.73-2.08) or rectum (HR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.66-2.02) compared to relatives of controls. This risk was consistently greater for FDR when cases developed CRC below the age of 60 years. Conclusions Relatives of CRC patients have a similarly elevated risk of CRC regardless of colonic tumour subsite in the index patient, and it is greatest for relatives of younger age index cases.

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