Familial aggregation of Parkinson's disease: A population-based case- control study in Europe

A. Elbaz, F. Grigoletto, M. Baldereschi, M. M. Breteler, J. M. Manubens-Bertran, S. Lopez-Pousa, J. F. Dartigues, A. Alpérovitch, C. Tzourio, Walter A Rocca

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the familial aggregation of PD in a large collaborative population-based case-control study. Background: Most previous case-control studies of the familial aggregation of PD have been hospital- or clinic-based. Methods: We included 219 prevalent cases ascertained in three European populations (centers), using a two-phase design consisting of screening and examination by a neurologist. Each case was matched by age, sex, and center to three controls drawn from the same populations (n = 657). Presence of PD among first-degree relatives (parents and siblings) was determined using the family history approach for 175 cases and 481 controls. Results: Overall, a positive family history (at least one parent or sibling affected by PD) was reported in 10.3% of patients and 3.5% of controls (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6 to 6.6). A similar association was observed when analyses were restricted to nondemented patients and controls (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.7 to 8.7) or to newly diagnosed patients (OR = 3.3; 95% CI = 0.9 to 11.9). We found a significant trend of increasing risk with increasing number of affected relatives (p = 0.003). Analyses stratified by age showed a stronger association for younger PD patients (OR = 7.6; 95% CI = 1.5 to 38.9) than for older patients (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.1 to 5.7). Conclusions: In this large sample of prevalent PD patients and population-matched controls, PD significantly aggregates in families, with the strength of the association being age-dependent. Therefore, familial factors, which can be genetic, environmental, or both, play a role in PD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1876-1882
Number of pages7
JournalNeurology
Volume52
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1999

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Parkinson Disease
Case-Control Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population
Siblings
Population Control
Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Elbaz, A., Grigoletto, F., Baldereschi, M., Breteler, M. M., Manubens-Bertran, J. M., Lopez-Pousa, S., ... Rocca, W. A. (1999). Familial aggregation of Parkinson's disease: A population-based case- control study in Europe. Neurology, 52(9), 1876-1882.

Familial aggregation of Parkinson's disease : A population-based case- control study in Europe. / Elbaz, A.; Grigoletto, F.; Baldereschi, M.; Breteler, M. M.; Manubens-Bertran, J. M.; Lopez-Pousa, S.; Dartigues, J. F.; Alpérovitch, A.; Tzourio, C.; Rocca, Walter A.

In: Neurology, Vol. 52, No. 9, 1999, p. 1876-1882.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elbaz, A, Grigoletto, F, Baldereschi, M, Breteler, MM, Manubens-Bertran, JM, Lopez-Pousa, S, Dartigues, JF, Alpérovitch, A, Tzourio, C & Rocca, WA 1999, 'Familial aggregation of Parkinson's disease: A population-based case- control study in Europe', Neurology, vol. 52, no. 9, pp. 1876-1882.
Elbaz A, Grigoletto F, Baldereschi M, Breteler MM, Manubens-Bertran JM, Lopez-Pousa S et al. Familial aggregation of Parkinson's disease: A population-based case- control study in Europe. Neurology. 1999;52(9):1876-1882.
Elbaz, A. ; Grigoletto, F. ; Baldereschi, M. ; Breteler, M. M. ; Manubens-Bertran, J. M. ; Lopez-Pousa, S. ; Dartigues, J. F. ; Alpérovitch, A. ; Tzourio, C. ; Rocca, Walter A. / Familial aggregation of Parkinson's disease : A population-based case- control study in Europe. In: Neurology. 1999 ; Vol. 52, No. 9. pp. 1876-1882.
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title = "Familial aggregation of Parkinson's disease: A population-based case- control study in Europe",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate the familial aggregation of PD in a large collaborative population-based case-control study. Background: Most previous case-control studies of the familial aggregation of PD have been hospital- or clinic-based. Methods: We included 219 prevalent cases ascertained in three European populations (centers), using a two-phase design consisting of screening and examination by a neurologist. Each case was matched by age, sex, and center to three controls drawn from the same populations (n = 657). Presence of PD among first-degree relatives (parents and siblings) was determined using the family history approach for 175 cases and 481 controls. Results: Overall, a positive family history (at least one parent or sibling affected by PD) was reported in 10.3{\%} of patients and 3.5{\%} of controls (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 1.6 to 6.6). A similar association was observed when analyses were restricted to nondemented patients and controls (OR = 3.9; 95{\%} CI = 1.7 to 8.7) or to newly diagnosed patients (OR = 3.3; 95{\%} CI = 0.9 to 11.9). We found a significant trend of increasing risk with increasing number of affected relatives (p = 0.003). Analyses stratified by age showed a stronger association for younger PD patients (OR = 7.6; 95{\%} CI = 1.5 to 38.9) than for older patients (OR = 2.5; 95{\%} CI = 1.1 to 5.7). Conclusions: In this large sample of prevalent PD patients and population-matched controls, PD significantly aggregates in families, with the strength of the association being age-dependent. Therefore, familial factors, which can be genetic, environmental, or both, play a role in PD.",
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T1 - Familial aggregation of Parkinson's disease

T2 - A population-based case- control study in Europe

AU - Elbaz, A.

AU - Grigoletto, F.

AU - Baldereschi, M.

AU - Breteler, M. M.

AU - Manubens-Bertran, J. M.

AU - Lopez-Pousa, S.

AU - Dartigues, J. F.

AU - Alpérovitch, A.

AU - Tzourio, C.

AU - Rocca, Walter A

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N2 - Objective: To investigate the familial aggregation of PD in a large collaborative population-based case-control study. Background: Most previous case-control studies of the familial aggregation of PD have been hospital- or clinic-based. Methods: We included 219 prevalent cases ascertained in three European populations (centers), using a two-phase design consisting of screening and examination by a neurologist. Each case was matched by age, sex, and center to three controls drawn from the same populations (n = 657). Presence of PD among first-degree relatives (parents and siblings) was determined using the family history approach for 175 cases and 481 controls. Results: Overall, a positive family history (at least one parent or sibling affected by PD) was reported in 10.3% of patients and 3.5% of controls (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6 to 6.6). A similar association was observed when analyses were restricted to nondemented patients and controls (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.7 to 8.7) or to newly diagnosed patients (OR = 3.3; 95% CI = 0.9 to 11.9). We found a significant trend of increasing risk with increasing number of affected relatives (p = 0.003). Analyses stratified by age showed a stronger association for younger PD patients (OR = 7.6; 95% CI = 1.5 to 38.9) than for older patients (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.1 to 5.7). Conclusions: In this large sample of prevalent PD patients and population-matched controls, PD significantly aggregates in families, with the strength of the association being age-dependent. Therefore, familial factors, which can be genetic, environmental, or both, play a role in PD.

AB - Objective: To investigate the familial aggregation of PD in a large collaborative population-based case-control study. Background: Most previous case-control studies of the familial aggregation of PD have been hospital- or clinic-based. Methods: We included 219 prevalent cases ascertained in three European populations (centers), using a two-phase design consisting of screening and examination by a neurologist. Each case was matched by age, sex, and center to three controls drawn from the same populations (n = 657). Presence of PD among first-degree relatives (parents and siblings) was determined using the family history approach for 175 cases and 481 controls. Results: Overall, a positive family history (at least one parent or sibling affected by PD) was reported in 10.3% of patients and 3.5% of controls (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6 to 6.6). A similar association was observed when analyses were restricted to nondemented patients and controls (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.7 to 8.7) or to newly diagnosed patients (OR = 3.3; 95% CI = 0.9 to 11.9). We found a significant trend of increasing risk with increasing number of affected relatives (p = 0.003). Analyses stratified by age showed a stronger association for younger PD patients (OR = 7.6; 95% CI = 1.5 to 38.9) than for older patients (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.1 to 5.7). Conclusions: In this large sample of prevalent PD patients and population-matched controls, PD significantly aggregates in families, with the strength of the association being age-dependent. Therefore, familial factors, which can be genetic, environmental, or both, play a role in PD.

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