Failure to reach the goal of measles elimination: Apparent paradox of measles infections in immunized persons

Gregory A. Poland, Robert M. Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Measles is the most transmissible disease known to man. During the 1980s, the number of measles cases in the United States rose dramatically. Surprisingly, 20% to 40% of these cases occurred in persons who had been appropriately immunized against measles. In response, the United States adopted a two-dose universal measles immunization program. We critically examine the effect of vaccine failure in measles occurring in immunized persons. Methods: We performed a computerized bibliographic literature search (National Library of Medicine) for all English-language articles dealing with measles outbreaks. We limited our search to reports of US and Canadian school-based outbreaks of measles, and we spoke with experts to get estimates of vaccine failure rates. In addition, we devised a hypothetical model of a school where measles immunization rates could be varied, vaccine failure rates could be calculated, and the percentage of measles cases occurring in immunized students could be determined. Results: We found 18 reports of measles outbreaks in very highly immunized school populations where 71% to 99.8% of students were immunized against measles. Despite these high rates of immunization, 30% to 100% (mean, 77%) of all measles cases in these outbreaks occurred in previously immunized students. In our hypothetical school model, after more than 95% of schoolchildren are immunized against measles, the majority of measles cases occur in appropriately immunized children. Conclusions: The apparent paradox is that as measles immunization rates rise to high levels in a population, measles becomes a disease of immunized persons. Because of the failure rate of the vaccine and the unique transmissibility of the measles virus, the currently available measles vaccine, used in a single-dose strategy, is unlikely to completely eliminate measles. The long-term success of a two-dose strategy to eliminate measles remains to be determined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1815-1820
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume154
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 22 1994

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Measles
Infection
Disease Outbreaks
Vaccines
Immunization
Students
National Library of Medicine (U.S.)
Measles Vaccine
Immunization Programs
Measles virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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Failure to reach the goal of measles elimination : Apparent paradox of measles infections in immunized persons. / Poland, Gregory A.; Jacobson, Robert M.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 154, No. 16, 22.08.1994, p. 1815-1820.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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