Factors associated with positive attitudes toward organ donation in Arab Americans

Aasim I. Padela, Shoaib Rasheed, Gareth J W Warren, Hwajung Choi, Amit Mathur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The demand for transplantable organ continues to exceed supply, particularly in minority patient populations. We explored the factors influencing organ donation attitude within the Arab American community. Methods: Secondary data analysis from a face-to-face survey administered in late 2003 to 1016 adults from a representative population-based sample on Greater Detroit Arab Americans. Results: Christian Arab Americans were more likely than Muslim Arab Americans, and women more than men, to believe organ donation after death was justifiable. Higher educational attainment and income, as well as greater acculturation into American society, were associated with greater odds of believing organ donation to be justified. Self-reported health status and level of psychological distress and health insurance status were not associated with beliefs about organ donation. Conclusions: A multifaceted approach toward increasing organ donation rates in this growing population requires targeted community-health care system collaborations involving religious and civic leaders using Arabic language and culturally sensitive media. Summary: Arab Americans represent a growing population about which little is known in regard to organ donation and transplantation. This population is not specifically captured within national and local transplantation databases, and little empiric work has assessed attitudes and barriers toward organ donation and transplantation within this community. Our work represents the first to use a representative population-based sample to explore the modifiable and non-modifiable characteristics of those who believe cadaveric organ donation to be justified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)800-808
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Tissue and Organ Procurement
Population
Organ Transplantation
Health Status
Community Health Planning
Community Health Services
Islam
Acculturation
Insurance Coverage
Health Insurance
Language
Transplantation
Databases
Psychology
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Arab Americans
  • Beliefs
  • Cadaveric organ donation
  • Minority organ donation
  • Muslim

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Factors associated with positive attitudes toward organ donation in Arab Americans. / Padela, Aasim I.; Rasheed, Shoaib; Warren, Gareth J W; Choi, Hwajung; Mathur, Amit.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 25, No. 5, 09.2011, p. 800-808.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Padela, Aasim I. ; Rasheed, Shoaib ; Warren, Gareth J W ; Choi, Hwajung ; Mathur, Amit. / Factors associated with positive attitudes toward organ donation in Arab Americans. In: Clinical Transplantation. 2011 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 800-808.
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