Factors associated with greater patient satisfaction in outpatient neurosurgical clinics: Recommendation for surgery, older age, cranial chief complaint, and public health insurance

Zachary Christian, Kara L. Curley, Alexandra E. Richards, Nan Zhang, Mark K. Lyons, Bernard R. Bendok, Naresh Patel, Maziyar A. Kalani, Matthew T. Neal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Patient satisfaction has increasingly played a role in determining care quality. Surveys are used to gauge patient experience, satisfaction of care, and likelihood to recommend providers and facilities. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether clinical and demographic data predict greater patient satisfaction with providers in the outpatient neurosurgery clinic. Methods: Press-Ganey (Press Ganey Associates, South Bend, IL) evaluations of 1521 patients were reviewed in an academic neurosurgical clinic from January 1, 2019 through February 1, 2021. We analyzed associations between Press-Ganey ratings and patient demographics, chief complaint, psychiatric comorbidities, number of orders placed, medication prescriptions, surgical recommendation, payor status, and referral source. We used univariate logistic regression to assess for associations between independent variables and Press-Ganey ratings. Multivariable logistic regression was used for associated factors. Results: For the Likelihood to Recommend question, older age (p = 0.003), cranial chief complaint (p = 0.046), and recommendations for surgery (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with “good” ratings. For the rating of Care Received, older age (p = 0.002), cranial chief complaint (p = 0.05), and recommendations for surgery (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with “good” ratings. For Confidence in Care Provider question, recommendations for surgery (p = <0.001) and government insurance type (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with “good” ratings. Conclusions: Patients with older age, cranial pathologies, a recommendation for surgery, and government health insurance were significantly associated with favorable patient satisfaction with providers in the outpatient neurosurgery clinic. Prospective studies should target patient populations who are younger, have spinal complaints, have non-surgical needs, and have commercial insurance to improve satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number107436
JournalClinical Neurology and Neurosurgery
Volume222
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Neurosurgery
  • Patient satisfaction
  • Press-Ganey
  • Spine surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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