Factors associated with Americans' ratings of health care quality

What do they tell us about the raters and the health care system?

Wen Ying Sylvia Chou, Lin Chun Wang, Lila J Rutten, Richard P. Moser, Bradford W. Hesse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Consumer satisfaction ratings of health care quality represent a commonly used measure of health care performance. Identifying factors associated with ratings will help us understand the relative influence of individuals' sociodemographic and health characteristics on satisfaction level, thus informing policy making and clinical practice. Existing research has yielded mixed results on key predictors of consumer ratings. Using nationally representative data, this study aims to identify factors associated with Americans' ratings of health care quality. Data from 2008 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) were analyzed using weighted multinomial logistic regressions to estimate consumer ratings. Predictor variables included demographics, health status, care access, and attitude and perceptions about health. Overall ratings were positively skewed; 70% of respondents rated care as excellent or very good. Minority race, psychological distress, not having had cancer, not having a regular health care provider, not having health insurance, lacking confidence in self-care, and avoidance of doctors were significantly associated with lower ratings. The study identifies the psychosocial characteristics associated with lower consumer ratings. The results highlight the importance of using multiple approaches to assess quality of care, including considering patient characteristics, and contribute to the evidence base for evaluating overall quality of care at the dawn of health care reform.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-156
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume15
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Quality of Health Care
Health care
rating
health care
Delivery of Health Care
Personnel rating
Health
Health Care Reform
Policy Making
Health Insurance
Self Care
Health Personnel
Health insurance
Health Status
Logistic Models
Demography
Psychology
Logistics
health information
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Communication

Cite this

Factors associated with Americans' ratings of health care quality : What do they tell us about the raters and the health care system? / Chou, Wen Ying Sylvia; Wang, Lin Chun; Rutten, Lila J; Moser, Richard P.; Hesse, Bradford W.

In: Journal of Health Communication, Vol. 15, No. SUPPL. 3, 2010, p. 147-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chou, Wen Ying Sylvia ; Wang, Lin Chun ; Rutten, Lila J ; Moser, Richard P. ; Hesse, Bradford W. / Factors associated with Americans' ratings of health care quality : What do they tell us about the raters and the health care system?. In: Journal of Health Communication. 2010 ; Vol. 15, No. SUPPL. 3. pp. 147-156.
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