Factors affecting whites' and blacks' attitudes toward race concordance with doctors

Jennifer Malat, David Purcell, Michelle Van Ryn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper assesses whether 2 dimensions of whites' and blacks' attitudes toward race concordance with doctors are associated with past unfair treatment in health care and general racial attitudes, and whether the association varies by race. Using telephone survey data, we find that among blacks, but not whites, more positive attitudes toward race-concordant doctors are associated with past unfair treatment in health care related to doctor race. In addition, we find that among whites, but not blacks, more positive attitudes toward race concordance are associated with negative attitudes toward interracial contact in general. We conclude that these dimensions of blacks' and whites' attitudes toward health care are associated with distinct factors. The findings encourage research on how attitudes formed outside health care, as well as how health care experiences influence attitudes toward health care and how these factors may vary by location in the system of racial inequality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)787-793
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume102
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs
  • Patient-physician relationship
  • Race/ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Factors affecting whites' and blacks' attitudes toward race concordance with doctors. / Malat, Jennifer; Purcell, David; Van Ryn, Michelle.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 102, No. 9, 09.2010, p. 787-793.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malat, Jennifer ; Purcell, David ; Van Ryn, Michelle. / Factors affecting whites' and blacks' attitudes toward race concordance with doctors. In: Journal of the National Medical Association. 2010 ; Vol. 102, No. 9. pp. 787-793.
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