Factors affecting longitudinal trajectories of plasma sphingomyelins: The Baltimore longitudinal study of aging

Michelle M Mielke, Veera Venkata Ratnam Bandaru, Dingfen Han, Yang An, Susan M. Resnick, Luigi Ferrucci, Norman J. Haughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sphingomyelin metabolism has been linked to several diseases and to longevity. However, few epidemiological studies have quantified individual plasma sphingomyelin species (identified by acyl-chain length and saturation) or their relationship between demographic factors and disease processes. In this study, we determined plasma concentrations of distinct sphingomyelin species in 992 individuals, aged 55 and older, enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Participants were followed, with serial measures, up to 6 visits and 38 years (3972 total samples). Quantitative analyses were performed on a high-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. Linear mixed models were used to assess variation in specific sphingomyelin species and associations with demographics, diseases, medications or lifestyle factors, and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. We found that most sphingomyelin species increased with age. Women had higher plasma levels of all sphingomyelin species and showed steeper trajectories of age-related increases compared to men. African Americans also showed higher circulating sphingomyelin concentrations compared to Caucasians. Diabetes, smoking, and plasma triglycerides were associated with lower levels of many sphingomyelins and dihydrosphingomyelins. Notably, these associations showed specificity to sphingomyelin acyl-chain length and saturation. These results demonstrate that longitudinal changes in circulating sphingomyelin levels are influenced by age, sex, race, lifestyle factors, and diseases. It will be important to further establish the intra-individual age- and sex-specific changes in each sphingomyelin species in relation to disease onset and progression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)112-121
Number of pages10
JournalAging Cell
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Baltimore
Sphingomyelins
Longitudinal Studies
Life Style
Triglycerides
Demography
African Americans
Disease Progression
Epidemiologic Studies
Linear Models
Smoking
Cholesterol
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Dihydrosphingomyelin
  • Human
  • Longitudinal
  • Sex differences
  • Sphingomyelin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Aging

Cite this

Mielke, M. M., Bandaru, V. V. R., Han, D., An, Y., Resnick, S. M., Ferrucci, L., & Haughey, N. J. (2015). Factors affecting longitudinal trajectories of plasma sphingomyelins: The Baltimore longitudinal study of aging. Aging Cell, 14(1), 112-121. https://doi.org/10.1111/acel.12275

Factors affecting longitudinal trajectories of plasma sphingomyelins : The Baltimore longitudinal study of aging. / Mielke, Michelle M; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Han, Dingfen; An, Yang; Resnick, Susan M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Haughey, Norman J.

In: Aging Cell, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.02.2015, p. 112-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mielke, MM, Bandaru, VVR, Han, D, An, Y, Resnick, SM, Ferrucci, L & Haughey, NJ 2015, 'Factors affecting longitudinal trajectories of plasma sphingomyelins: The Baltimore longitudinal study of aging', Aging Cell, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 112-121. https://doi.org/10.1111/acel.12275
Mielke, Michelle M ; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam ; Han, Dingfen ; An, Yang ; Resnick, Susan M. ; Ferrucci, Luigi ; Haughey, Norman J. / Factors affecting longitudinal trajectories of plasma sphingomyelins : The Baltimore longitudinal study of aging. In: Aging Cell. 2015 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 112-121.
@article{e2f98a51c79549a0843f8a3f7f687e2b,
title = "Factors affecting longitudinal trajectories of plasma sphingomyelins: The Baltimore longitudinal study of aging",
abstract = "Sphingomyelin metabolism has been linked to several diseases and to longevity. However, few epidemiological studies have quantified individual plasma sphingomyelin species (identified by acyl-chain length and saturation) or their relationship between demographic factors and disease processes. In this study, we determined plasma concentrations of distinct sphingomyelin species in 992 individuals, aged 55 and older, enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Participants were followed, with serial measures, up to 6 visits and 38 years (3972 total samples). Quantitative analyses were performed on a high-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. Linear mixed models were used to assess variation in specific sphingomyelin species and associations with demographics, diseases, medications or lifestyle factors, and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. We found that most sphingomyelin species increased with age. Women had higher plasma levels of all sphingomyelin species and showed steeper trajectories of age-related increases compared to men. African Americans also showed higher circulating sphingomyelin concentrations compared to Caucasians. Diabetes, smoking, and plasma triglycerides were associated with lower levels of many sphingomyelins and dihydrosphingomyelins. Notably, these associations showed specificity to sphingomyelin acyl-chain length and saturation. These results demonstrate that longitudinal changes in circulating sphingomyelin levels are influenced by age, sex, race, lifestyle factors, and diseases. It will be important to further establish the intra-individual age- and sex-specific changes in each sphingomyelin species in relation to disease onset and progression.",
keywords = "Aging, Dihydrosphingomyelin, Human, Longitudinal, Sex differences, Sphingomyelin",
author = "Mielke, {Michelle M} and Bandaru, {Veera Venkata Ratnam} and Dingfen Han and Yang An and Resnick, {Susan M.} and Luigi Ferrucci and Haughey, {Norman J.}",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/acel.12275",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "112--121",
journal = "Aging Cell",
issn = "1474-9718",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors affecting longitudinal trajectories of plasma sphingomyelins

T2 - The Baltimore longitudinal study of aging

AU - Mielke, Michelle M

AU - Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam

AU - Han, Dingfen

AU - An, Yang

AU - Resnick, Susan M.

AU - Ferrucci, Luigi

AU - Haughey, Norman J.

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Sphingomyelin metabolism has been linked to several diseases and to longevity. However, few epidemiological studies have quantified individual plasma sphingomyelin species (identified by acyl-chain length and saturation) or their relationship between demographic factors and disease processes. In this study, we determined plasma concentrations of distinct sphingomyelin species in 992 individuals, aged 55 and older, enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Participants were followed, with serial measures, up to 6 visits and 38 years (3972 total samples). Quantitative analyses were performed on a high-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. Linear mixed models were used to assess variation in specific sphingomyelin species and associations with demographics, diseases, medications or lifestyle factors, and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. We found that most sphingomyelin species increased with age. Women had higher plasma levels of all sphingomyelin species and showed steeper trajectories of age-related increases compared to men. African Americans also showed higher circulating sphingomyelin concentrations compared to Caucasians. Diabetes, smoking, and plasma triglycerides were associated with lower levels of many sphingomyelins and dihydrosphingomyelins. Notably, these associations showed specificity to sphingomyelin acyl-chain length and saturation. These results demonstrate that longitudinal changes in circulating sphingomyelin levels are influenced by age, sex, race, lifestyle factors, and diseases. It will be important to further establish the intra-individual age- and sex-specific changes in each sphingomyelin species in relation to disease onset and progression.

AB - Sphingomyelin metabolism has been linked to several diseases and to longevity. However, few epidemiological studies have quantified individual plasma sphingomyelin species (identified by acyl-chain length and saturation) or their relationship between demographic factors and disease processes. In this study, we determined plasma concentrations of distinct sphingomyelin species in 992 individuals, aged 55 and older, enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Participants were followed, with serial measures, up to 6 visits and 38 years (3972 total samples). Quantitative analyses were performed on a high-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. Linear mixed models were used to assess variation in specific sphingomyelin species and associations with demographics, diseases, medications or lifestyle factors, and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. We found that most sphingomyelin species increased with age. Women had higher plasma levels of all sphingomyelin species and showed steeper trajectories of age-related increases compared to men. African Americans also showed higher circulating sphingomyelin concentrations compared to Caucasians. Diabetes, smoking, and plasma triglycerides were associated with lower levels of many sphingomyelins and dihydrosphingomyelins. Notably, these associations showed specificity to sphingomyelin acyl-chain length and saturation. These results demonstrate that longitudinal changes in circulating sphingomyelin levels are influenced by age, sex, race, lifestyle factors, and diseases. It will be important to further establish the intra-individual age- and sex-specific changes in each sphingomyelin species in relation to disease onset and progression.

KW - Aging

KW - Dihydrosphingomyelin

KW - Human

KW - Longitudinal

KW - Sex differences

KW - Sphingomyelin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84922611821&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84922611821&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/acel.12275

DO - 10.1111/acel.12275

M3 - Article

C2 - 25345489

AN - SCOPUS:84922611821

VL - 14

SP - 112

EP - 121

JO - Aging Cell

JF - Aging Cell

SN - 1474-9718

IS - 1

ER -